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Akiko Tetsuya’s “The Last Star of the East: Brigitte Lin Ching Hsia and Her Films” Article by Yunda Eddie Feng, DVDBeaver.com

Akiko Tetsuya, an intrepid, dedicated reporter, gained extraordinary access to Chinese superstar Brigitte Lin Ching

Hsia, her friends, and her colleagues.

Tetsuya

has

given

cinephiles

valuable

actress’s life and movie industries.

work

as

well

as

the

In the

insights

Taiwan

process, into the

Ms.

and

Hong

Kong

When one mentions Hong-Kong Cinema, casual movie viewers might say, “Oh, I saw ‘Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon’”, or, “That

‘Hero’ flick had a know can do little very least, people Hidden Dragon” and like China itself,

lot of pretty colors”.

Those of us in the

but suppress our agony; after all, at the have seen the likes of “Crouching Tiger,

“Hero”.

Chinese-language cinemas in

general,

are

on

the

rise

on

the

global

stage.

The current ascension of Chinese c developments that took place durin when “new wave” movements in Mainl

Kong broke the past.

free from the stifling In Mainland China and T

movements were the results of expression or examining

of movi serious

were

not

box-office

hits

at

home.

Kong’s “new wave” successfully with

flicks--even the mainstream fare

an American star like Tom “Magnolia” and “Eyes Wide

Cruise, Shut” mi

inema has its roots in g the 1980s and early-1990s, and China, Taiwan, and Hong traditions and conditions of aiwan, the “new wave” emakers developing new methods

social issues; the movies On the other hand, Hong “artsy” ones--often competed

for box-office dominance. appearing in movies like

For

ght

seem

risky.

For

Hong-Kong

star Maggie Cheung, appearing in movies like Love” is as (financially) sound as appearing “Police Story” series.

“In the Mood for in Jackie Chan’s

Though Hong-Kong cinema was extremely vibrant and dominated

the

Southeast-Asia market during about the territory’s return movie industry to experience

the 1980s and 1990s, anxieties

to Chinese rule in a severe downturn.

1997 caused

the

In effect,

this

explains Mainland

why today’s Western audiences are more familiar with Chinese movies in general (like Zhang Yimou’s “Hero”

and “Raise the Red Lantern” or Chen Kaige’s “Farewell My Concubine”) than they are with Hong-Kong or Taiwan fare.

(Ang

Lee, though born in Taiwan, is based in the U.S.

John Woo, Chow

Yun-fat, and Jackie Chan are they have made movies here.)

famous in America primarily because Americans’ lack of familiarity

with Hong-Kong movies is lamentable.

Major talents like Leslie

Cheung Chung, missed

and and out

Anita Mui are dead, and stars like Joey Wong, Cherie

Sally Yeh no longer make movies. on witnessing a golden era.

Audiences

here

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