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Tsunami™ Digital Sound Decoder - page 11 / 77

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Basics of Programming

If you don’t have the conversion chart available, you can also calculate the value in the following manner. Reading from right to left, each bit has a decimal value associated with it, beginning with a 1 and doubling this value as you go from bit 0 to bit 7. This value is only counted when the bit is a ‘1’. Looking at the figure below, you can see that using this method, bit 1 has a value of 2 and bit 4 has a value of 16. Adding these two numbers together gives the correct decimal value of 18.

bit 7

bit 6

bit 5

bit 4

bit 3

bit 2

bit 1

bit 0

When bit is set to 1, value =

128

64

32

16

8

4

Therefore:

0

+

0

+

0

+

16

+

0

+

0

2

  • +

    2

1

  • +

    0

= 18

Programming Methods

There are two methods for changing the sound decoder’s CVs:

Service Mode Programming - This programming mode usually requires the locomotive to be placed on a special programming track or connected to a dedicated programmer. Tsunami is an advanced line of decoders and support four types of service mode instructions:

Address Mode - Can change CV 1 (Primary Address) only. Register Mode - Can change CVs 1,2,3,4,7,8 and 29 only. Paged Mode - Uses a page register to indirectly modify any CV. Direct Mode - Can directly change any CV.

Operations Mode Programming - Sometimes called ‘Ops Mode’ or ‘Programming on the Main’, this programming mode allows the CVs to be changed while the locomotive is operating on the layout even when other locomotives are present. The neat thing about this mode is that the CVs can be changed in the middle of operation allowing the engineer for example, to increase the momentum rate of a locomotive after it couples to a train. The main disadvantage of operations mode programming is that the CV data cannot be read back to verify its value.

Reading CVs Certain command stations also allow you to read a CV during Service Mode Programming, which is useful to verify its current setting. If you have trouble reading or verifying CVs, the problem may be due to the design of your command station and not the DSD itself. Tsunami and all other decoders communicate back to the command station using what’s called an acknowledgment pulse, which is defined in NMRA RP-9.2.3 as “an increased load on the programming track of at least 60mA for at least 5ms.” Like most decoders, the DSD generates the acknowledgment pulse by momentarily applying power to the motor. You can often visually verify that the Tsunami is properly responding to your programmer by observing a slight twitch in the

Tsunami Steam Sound User’s Guide

Page 8

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