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and into a separate pile (see figure 1). This metal wire has not found much use in

industry in the United States as it contains too much rubber to be processed for scrap

metal as it is. As a result, there are stockpiles of this metal wire in the United States

(see Appendix D).

Figure 3 - Whole tyre shredding teeth on the left, and the rotating magnetic drum for separation of metal wires on the right.

Uses

Once most of the metal wire is removed from the rubber the shreds become

much more useful. Shredded rubber from tyres has found uses ranging from plant

mulch to highway bedding. In the United States the most common use for tyres is for

fuel; tyre rubber has a fuel value about equal to that of coal, although some sources

claim a greater fuel value (Farrell, 1999b). Although the process is not an

environmentally friendly recycling method, the waste from the burnt tyres, which

includes steel slag from the belts, can be used in creating concrete (Clark, Meardon, &

Russell, 1993).

The civil engineering applications for tyre shreds are numerous. The chips can

be used as a highway bedding (Hylands & Shulman, 2003), insulation material, sound

barrier, and as a “sorptive” (a process that can filter some heavy metals) drainage

layer (Edil, Park, & Kim, 2004) to name a few such applications. The use of the tyre

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