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“CRIMSON NATION”

FADE IN:

EXT. RIVER VALLEY, CHEROKEE NATION, SPRING OF 1850 - DAWN

Glistening sunrays cut through a thin morning fog. The light moves across the tops of rippling white waters that finally become a rambling shallow river. The clear current quietly rolls through the valley with a simple trickle that breaks the silence.

On a tree lined ridge above the river the underbrush rustles. The sound of a horse’s nostrils snorting can be heard.

A red-tailed hawk screams and soars low across the tops of old growth oak trees.

Below the trees an ancient Cherokee Indian Nation Village sits next to the timber lined riverbank.

The village’s main dirt street is a blur of activity between Caucasian traders and American Indian merchants trading merchandise.

A SCROLL ROLLS OVER THE SCENE NARRATED BY PRINCIPLE CHEROKEE CHIEF JOHN ROSS -

 JOHN ROSS (V.O.)

In a young and growing nation, British

land company officials and an Indian

Nation’s insubordinate chief meet to

discuss the sale of Indian land outside

of his nations council rule. The Ani

YunWiha Indian Nation, meaning “Real

People” got their name when the tribe’s

neighbors, the Choctaw renamed them

"Chillaki" which means cave dweller

and finally The Real People became

known for all time as "Cherokee". Our

tribe traded goods with white traders

from many nations, but today in this

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