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FUTURE TRENDS OF TILAPIA AQUACULTURE IN THE AMERICAS - page 5 / 13

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Country Canada Chile China

Product Form Fillet, frozen Fillet,fresh Fillet, frozen

Kg 34,836

US$ 156,149

1,868 38,102

9,822 217,510

Frozen Total

435,259 473,361

437,364 654,874

Costa Rica

Fillet,fresh

2,206,290

10,265,503

Frozen Total

3,362 2,209,652

5,579 10,271,082

Ecuador

Fillet,fresh

645,851

2,512,811

Fillet, frozen Frozen Total

79,752 31,245 756,848

274,212 90,716 2,877,739

Honduras

Fillet,fresh

435,597

2,501,822

Fillet, frozen Frozen Total

46,525 24,058 506,180

259,439 132,566 2,893,827

India Indonesia Jamaica

Fillet,fresh Fillet, frozen Fillet,fresh

21,760 885,296 181,984

34,778 4,258,091 1,212,093

Fillet, frozen Total

99,268 281,252

356,876 1,568,969

Malaysia Mexico Nicaragua

Frozen Fillet,fresh Fillet,fresh

9,645 1,057 6,587

9,548 6,626 40,398

Fillet, frozen Frozen Total

21,914 318 28,819

94,786 1,875 137,059

Panama Philippines Taiwan

Fillet,fresh Fillet, frozen Fillet,fresh

3,845 18,457 84,863

18,179 21,705 449,110

Fillet, frozen Frozen Total

1,334,407 20,995,322 22,414,592

5,447,635 23,002,925 28,899,670

Thailand

Fillet, frozen

137,669

873,409

Frozen Total

35,235 172,904

48,489 921,898

Future Trends of Tilapia Aquaculture in the Americas

Table 2. Tilapia imports to the United States during 1998, by product form and country of origin (Derived from NMFS, Fisheries Statistics 1999)

Canada is also an important importer of fresh and frozen tilapia products from producers in Jamaica and Costa Rica. Fillet products are reported to be com- mon in markets and restaurants. With continued short-

t/wk) now supplied by farms in Idaho and North Da- kota (Morris 1999).

and frozen

6,285,928

29,016,954

Frozen, round

21,534,444

23,729,062

All forms

27,820,372

52,740,016

Total US Imports Fillets,fresh

256

ages of domestically caught fish, tilapia is likely to increase its market share further in Canada.

Canada

O. niloticus

# of Farms

6-8

Production (t)

100

Consumption (t)

500+

New investment

3 farms

Production is expected to increase quickly to 300% of the current level. Demand for live and fresh product will increase steadily, and Vancouver will become an important market. Demand for fillet prod- uct from off shore suppliers will increase steadily. Canada will be another center of technology devel- opment of recirculation systems.

Chile

Chile has a well developed aquaculture indus- try for salmon. In 1998, the US reported 1.3 t of fresh tilapia fillets imported from Chile. However, there are no reports of tilapia production in Chile. Imported tilapia were likely trans-shipped through Chile and were actually produced in a neighboring country. There is not likely to be much tilapia pro- duction in Chile and local demand is expected to be minimal.

Colombia

Tilapia were introduced to Colombia in 1960. Small scale aquaculture spread through the country, supported by international aid agencies and the Co- lombian government. Large scale commercial pro- duction began in the late 1980s. Several farms were built using intensive pond production techniques with rapid water exchange. These farms were stocked with red tilapia strains, and fish were pro- cessed for export to the US. Production volume in- creased rapidly between 1994 and 1998 from 8,000 t–18,000 t (Sepúlveda Cárdenas 2000).

The majority of tilapia produced have been red tilapia strains. In recent years O. niloticus has be- come more common. In the early 1990s most tila- pia were exported as frozen fillets to the US. In the mid-1990s a domestic market grew that accepted the fish in fresh forms (whole and fillet) and reduced export levels. US imports of Colombian tilapia were 224 t of fillets in 1996, 5 t in 1997, and 0 t in 1998. Colombia now imports tilapia from Venezuela to supply domestic demand.

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