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Chirobituaries

of Osteopathy and in active practice until 1945 when he retired to devote full time to his various manufacturing organizations. Dr. Donnahoe is survived by his wife, one daughter, two brothers,

one sister, two grandchildren and five great grandchildren.

The

Spinalator Company will operate in the future under a continuing plan organized by Dr. Donnahoe, with Mrs. Donnahoe and Miss Jean Manant, his administrative assistant in charge.

1972 (May/June): Digest of Chiropractic Economics [14(6)] includes:

  • -

    “Mrs. Napolitano” (p. 4):

It is with deep regret that we must report the passing of Mrs. Catherine Napolitano, beloved mother of Dr. Ernest Napolitano, president of Columbia Institute of Chiropractic, New York, on Wednesday March 29. Services were held Monday April 3rd with internment in the family mausoleum in New York. Many of the family friends and doctors throughout the United States and Canada sent contributions to the Catherine Napolitano Memorial Fund at Columbia Institute in lieu of flowers. The fund will be utilized to provide scholarships and aid chiropractic students, an activity very dear to her heart.

1973 (Jan): Chirogram [40(1)] includes:

  • -

    photo and obituary for Dale R Stoddard, LACC Dean of Studies

    • (p.

      18)

1973 (Feb): Chirogram [40(2)] includes:

  • -

    photo and obituary for Emile Painton EdD, LACC faculty

member in psychology for 16 years (p. 18)

1973 (May/June): Digest of Chiropractic Economics [15(6)] includes:

  • -

    “In memoriam: William J. Lorang, 1894-1973” (p. 49):

It is with deep regret we must report the sudden passing of Mr. William J. Lorang, President of the Williams Manufacturing Co., Elgin,

Illinois, in March of this year.

Mr. Lorang or “Bill” as he was

affectionately known by his thousands of friends throughout the profession had been actively connected with the chiropractic profession since 1919 when he joined Mr. Williams in the manufacture of Zenith Chiropractic Tables.

After he purchased the Company in 1921, he started his continuing program of design and development for the chiropractic tables, many of which design innovations are still in existence today.

A personal fried of both D.D. and B.J. Palmer, he also worked closely with other early pioneers in the profession, including doctors Hugh and Vinton Logan, Dr. Kitelinger [sic], Drs. Cleveland and Dearfield [sic] and many others too numerous to mention here.

Bill Lorang’s contribution to the chiropractic profession throughout the world will be long remembered and appreciated.

1973 (Oct ): Journal of the Canadian Chiropractic Association [17(3)] includes:

  • -

    obit for Cecil Clemmer DC (p. 32)

1973 (Nov): ACA Journal of Chiropractic [10(11) includes:

  • -

    "Dr. Sol Goldschmidt passes away" (p. 17):

We were saddened to learn of the death of Dr. Sol Goldschmidt in New York on October 14, where he had been hospitalized for a short period.

Dr. Goldschmidt, 73, was a 1922 graduate of Carver Chiropractic College and practiced in the New York City area. He was active in

Keating

41

numberous chiropractic and political groups, and served as a leading figure in the legislative battles to gain licensure in New York state.

Dr. Goldschmidt had executive secretary of the

been New

the New York NCA delegate York Chiropractic Association.

and He

was a with

prolific writer and co-authored several Dr. C.W. Weiant, including the

books book

and monographs

Medicine

and

Chiropractic. On the political scene he was active in New York Republican circles and was a member of ACA's SCOPE Committee from 1964 until his retirement two years ago. During the past two years he served ACA as Special Consultant on Education to the Board

of Governors.

Services were conducted in the Parkside Memorial Chapel, Queens, New York, on October 15. The survivors are his wife, Mrs. Ann Goldschmidt; and sons, Dr. Arnold and Joseph.

1973 (Nov): ACA Journal of Chiropractic [10(11)' includes:

  • -

    "Dr. Sol Goldschmidt passes away" (p. 17); includes

photograph:

We were saddened to learn of the death of Dr. Sol Goldschmidt in New York on October 14, where he had been hospitalized for a short period.

Dr. Goldschmidt, 73, was a 1922 graduate of Carver Chiropractic College and practiced in the New York City area. He was active in numberous chiropractic and political groups, and served as a leading figure in the legislative battles to gain licensure in New York state.

Dr. Goldschmidt had executive secretary of the

been New

the New York NCA delegate York Chiropractic Association.

and He

was a with

prolific writer and co-authored several Dr. C.W. Weiant, including the

books book

and monographs

Medicine

and

Chiropractic. On the political scene he was active in New York Republican circles and was a member of ACA's SCOPE Committee from 1964 until his retirement two years ago. During the past two years he served ACA as Special Consultant on Education to the Board

of Governors.

Services were conducted in the Parkside Memorial Chapel, Queens, New York, on October 15. The survivors are his wife, Mrs. Ann Goldschmidt; and sons, Dr. Arnold and Joseph.

1974 (Jan/Feb): Digest of Chiropractic Economics [16(4)] includes:

  • -

    “Dr. Sol Goldschmidt” (p. 7):

The profession realized a great loss when Dr. Sol Goldschmidt passed away at the age of 73.

He graduated from Carver Chiropractic Institute in 1922, attended Columbia University and practiced for half century in the City of New York. He held the office of the Board of Trustees of the Chiropractic Institute of New York and was appointed by Governor Rockefeller as a delegate tot he White House Conference on Aging in 1970. Both the American Chiropractic Association and the New York State Chiropractic Association elected Dr. Goldschmidt to Life Membership, the highest honor accorded a member.

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