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Chirobituaries

cover of The Chiropractic Journal (NCA), November, 1936

  • -

    notes death of William C. Schulze, M.D., D.C. (p. 3)

In Memoriam Dr. William Charles Schulze, President of the National College of Chiropractic, Chicago, Illinois, died Saturday, September 26, 1936, from cerebral hemorrhage. He was 66 years old. Surviving are his widow, the former Mathilde Jermundson, whom he married in 1900 at Duluth, Minnesota, and two children, William L. Schulze and Mrs. Phyllis Main. William L. Schulze is Secretary of the National College of Chiropractic.

Dr. Schulze was born in Germany, where he received his early

education, and came to this country at the age of 17.

He was

graduated from William Jewell College, Liberty, Missouri, and later taught school in Marion County, Kansas. In 1897, he received his M.D. degree from Rush Medical College, medical department of the

University of Chicago.

He practiced medicine for

Lomira, Wisconsin. For five Chicago Zander Institute.

years,

he

was

medical

three years at director of the

He became Chiropractic in

associated

with

the

1910.

Shortly

afterwards,

National

College

of

he

discontinued

medical

practice to devote his full time to Chiropractic education.

Throughout

his quarter century in Chiropractic, Dr.

Schulze

worked unceasingly

for its advancement. He contributed time and money the passage of good laws, traveling to any state where

freely toward his testimony

was needed. He was a loyal supporter of the

Association.

More

than

all,

he

worked

National Chiropractic for higher educational

standards in Chiropractic. standards of education.

Today, the entire profession favors higher

Dr. Schulze will be remembered as a leader who brought Physiotherapy to Chiropractic. He included Physiotherapy in the National College curriculum as early as 1912. At that time, it was called Physiological Therapeutics. Early diplomas of the National

College read, Therapeutics."

"Doctor

of

Chiropractic

and

Physiological

Although he favored a broad course in drugless healing.

Dr.

Schulze,

nevertheless,

placed

great

emphasis

on

spinal

adjustment.

He believed spinal adjustment to be the basis of spine is the line shaft of the body," was a Another was, "People get old not so much in the

healing work. "The favorite expression. face as in the back."

Keating

6

He was afraid students might be attracted too much by the glamor of

treating devices and be drawn away from spinal adjustment. cautioned student classes, therefore, and saw to it that students trained thoroughly in Chiropractic principles and technique.

He were

Dr. Schulze's life was a fine example of sacrificing self for an ideal. He never hesitated to give up comfort or personal pleasure to further his work. Although, because of failing health, he was inactive in school work in late years, he attended many Chiropractic

conventions. thousands of chiropractor at

It brought him the affection and loyal support of chiropractors. They recognized him as a true heart and a willing and able worker for the profession.

At the funeral services, Dr. Horace Bridges, who presided, spoke of Dr. Schulze's death, not as the end of life, but as the completion of a job. Dr. Schulze had visioned what was lacking in Chiropractic and set about to supply the need. He worked to build a Chiropractic school, teaching a broad Chiropractic discipline - not only in basic training but also in drugless therapeutics. The National College of Chiropractic and its present course in Chiropractic and Drugless Therapy is evidence that he succeeded. The institution he built is a fitting memorial to a full, useful and noble life.

As Chiropractic grew after the death of D.D. Palmer, so the broad concept of Chiropractic and Drugless Therapy, advanced by Dr. Schulze, will find increasing favor and acceptance as time goes on. The National College of Chiropractic is pledged to continue faithfully his ideals and to uphold the sound and progressive policies that have gained an enviable reputation for that institution under his able leadership. Thousands of chiropractors who were his students will carry throughout their lives the inspiration and instruction imparted by this brilliant teacher. The entire profession bows its head at the inestimable loss of this great and good man and courageous professional leader.

1936 (Dec): Logan Basic Technique Bulletin [1(1)], edited by Hugh B. Logan, D.C., includes:

  • -

    Hugh B. Logan, D.C. authors “A tribute” (p. 7), which is obituary

for Joy M. Loban, D.C.:

A neat little brochure came to hand today, no doubt designed to console friends insofar as possible; our friend and teacher, Joy M. Logan, passed from our midst on July 15, 1936, at Burbank, California.

Joy M. Loban, a sincere exponent of Chiropractic, died at the age of forty-nine years, primarily as the result of an accident, secondarily, as the result of crude, massive adjustment of the sacrum from posterior aspect.

Dr. Loban began his professional career in 1909 as an instructor of palpation and Chiropractic technique, and it will be interesting to know that it was he who initiated the practice of counting vertebrae, a radical departure in those times from dependence upon an appreciation of sectional spinal distortions only.

Dr. Loban blazed the way to a consideration of diagnosis as a necessary subject in the Chiropractic student’s training. He was dean of the faculty of the Universal Chiropractic College when I enrolled as the rawest of freshman rookies, was a rigid taskmaster, but was always honest in his Chiropractic convictions.

He has written several books, “Chiropractic Technique,” a really scientific compilation of that time, and his “Neurology,” which surpasses anything of its kind within the realm of Chiropractic texts even today, among others.

Dr. Loban joined the faculty of the Universal Chiropractic College in 1910, later effected the amalgamation of that school and the Pittsburgh College of Chiropractic, which he managed successfully for

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