X hits on this document

265 views

0 shares

0 downloads

0 comments

40 / 79

34

2011

DISHONORABLE DISPOSAL

can use parametric estimating to define the material composition within each vessel and the estimated value of recyclable materials that were dumped at sea.

Referencing Appendix B, the 2001 Rand Report recovery indices, and the current commodity price index, one can estimate the total material value lost over the past decade to the Federal government’s ocean dumping programs. With 95 vessels weighing a combined 674,318 tons, only 9% of which was waste, 613,629 tons of material was recyclable, worth an estimated

$611,849,180.

Essentially,

the

Federal

government dumped more than half a billion dollars at sea without accounting for any material value loss. On top of this astonishing figure, the Navy also paid substantial amounts to conduct each ocean dumping exercise.

The USS ARLINGTON is under construction using steel salvaged from the September 11, 2001 attack on the Pentagon. The sister ship, USS NEW YORK, was partially constructed of salvaged steel from the Twin Tower site, and the USS SOMERSET was partially constructed using steel from the crash site of Flight 93. Reusing salvaged scrap materials from retired naval vessels to build the new fleet would not only give tribute to those lost and those who served, but it would also reduce environmental impacts associated with primary metals mining to respect the needs of future generations. Image Source: Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding

Ferrous

% of Total Vessel Light Displacement*

79%

Material weight (ldt)

532,711

Commodity Price Index

$400/ton

Aluminum

Copper & Copper Alloys

Lead

Waste

Total

4%

4%

4%

9%

100%

Table 5: Vessel Composition and Material Value of Vessels Dumped at Sea 2000- 2010

26,973

26,973

$3.60/pound

$1/pound

26,973

$2/pound

60,689

$0

674,318

Material Value

$213,084,488

$120,837,786

$217,508,014

$60,418,893

$0

$611,849,180

Note: 2,240 pounds = 1 long ton

  • *

    Percentages sourced from the 2001 RAND Report, Disposal Options for Ships

See Appendix B for list of vessels

Air Pollution Costs

The ocean disposal of naval vessels discards valuable material that would otherwise be recycled to reduce virgin resource extraction and refining and related CO2 emissions, as

discussed in the previous section. Under a cap and trade model, carbon is a factor in assigning monetary value to various activities. Increasing value is assigned to activities or products that

BASEL ACTION NETWORK

Document info
Document views265
Page views265
Page last viewedFri Jan 20 16:19:03 UTC 2017
Pages79
Paragraphs3362
Words32498

Comments