X hits on this document

62 views

0 shares

0 downloads

0 comments

16 / 16

“Haste the, nymph, and bring with theeJest and youthful jollity.”

The Anapestic has two unaccented syllables followed by an accented one (               ). Here is an illustration of anapestic tetrameter from Browning’s “How They Brought the Good News from Ghent to Aix”:

“Not a word to each other as  we kept the great pace”

The opposite of anapestic is Dactylic. Which has one accented syllable followed by two accented ones (                ). This sample is from Longfellow’s “Evangeline” and is dactylic hexameter with the last foot incomplete:

“This is the forest primeval; the murmuring place and the hemlocks.”

The Spondaic is made up of two accented syllables (stone-deaf). A line entirely spondaic is very rare. Among the least common forms are the Pyrrhic, two unaccented syllables (in the); the Amphibrach, composed of an unaccented, accented, and unaccented (unkindly); and the Amphimacer, its opposite, made up of an accented followed by an unaccented, then another accented (cedar wood).

Villain (any scoundrel-like, treacherous, or evil opponent of the hero (see Antagonist.)

Vulgarism – a word or expression which is common but not in good use. It does not necessarily connote coarseness (ain’t).

Document info
Document views62
Page views67
Page last viewedFri Dec 02 18:40:39 UTC 2016
Pages16
Paragraphs345
Words9867

Comments