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FIGURE 2. National goals of education

The National Goals of Education frame all the detailed technical work of curriculum development and should be re- flected in all documents and materials developed by the Curriculum Development Centre. The national education goals are to: nurture and develop the personalities and inherent talents in each person; instill respect for human values and the will to safeguard national and social beliefs so as to help develop a healthy social unity; help the individual to socialize, enhancing social unity; help the individual keep his or her identity in the national and international context and to help him/her lead a so- cially harmonious life in the modern world; assist the modernization of the country by creating able manpower for its development; teach the thoughtful protection and wise use of Nepal’s natural resources; bring those who are underprivileged into the mainstream of the nation.

1

Nepali

2

Mathematics

3

English

4

Science

5

Social studies

6

Health, Population and

Environment Education

7

Optional Paper I

8

Optional Paper II



Weightage

Full Mark

5

100

5

100

5

100

5

100

5

100

4

100

TABLE 1. Secondary school curriculum structure— general secondary school level

Subjects

Classes 9 and 10

5

100

5

100

39

800

A. Option 1 paper subjects (any one) Languages: Nepali, Arabic, Avadhi, Bhojpuri, Bengalit, Chinese, Hindi, Japanese, Maithili, Sanskrit, Tibe- tan, Persian, Hebrew, Urdit, English, French, Ger- man, Greek, Latin, Russian, Spanish. (Other national languages of Nepal will be included in the curriculum, provided that grammar books, teaching materials, etc., are available.) Humanities, Social Science: history, geography, civics, economics, sociology. Optional mathematics

B. Option 2 paper subjects (any one) Interdisciplinary: agricultural education, food science, ar- chitectural education, industrial education, office management and accounting, auditing, typing and shorthand, computer science, home science, handi- crafts painting, sewing and knitting, bamboo-work, dance, music, Ayurveda naturopathy, health and physical education, Yoga education, photography, journalism, instrumentation.

Secondary Education Development Project

The Secondary Education Development Project (SEDP) began in 1993. SEDP originally aimed at improving and reinforcing three subjects (English, science, mathemat- ics). In 1997, support to Nepali and social studies was added. SEDP also has the goal of reforming the examina- tion system and providing materials and equipment to se- lected secondary schools. The project has been providing support services through the Secondary Education Devel- opment Centre and the twenty-five training centres.

Accomplishments

As of July 1998, CDC had produced ten curriculum book- lets outlining the lower secondary curriculum (grades 6– 8) and the secondary curriculum (grades 9 and 10) and covering all core subjects therein. The curriculum and textbooks for grades 6 (1996), 7 (1997) and 8 have been printed and distributed (1998). The lower secondary cur- riculum is being prepared for publication. However, Eng- lish is the only subject in which teacher’s guides have so far been produced.

In July 1998, the National Curriculum Council (NCC) decided to restructure the curriculum of grades 9 and 10, to allow for the inclusion of a new sixth core sub- ject, health, population and environment (HPE). This reduced English, Nepali, mathematics and science from six to five periods each week. The curriculum was adjusted in line with the reduction of periods. The grade 9 production schedule for textbooks and teacher’s guides has now been separated from that of grade 10. The grade 9 textbooks for the six core subjects were scheduled for printing by the end of March 1999, while completion of grade 9 teacher’s guides was foreseen for the end of April 1999.

CDC has formulated a seven-stage dissemination

strategy for the grades 9 and 10 curriculum. The first stage (approval) was completed in November 1998. Included in the strategy are: detailed planning, package development, training of master facilitators and facilita- tors, training of head-teachers, cluster-based and school- based workshops. The full programme will be completed by the end of July 1999.

The Publishing Unit’s first textbooks are clearly of a better quality than previous CDC/SEDP outputs. The unit has also produced a four-page CDC bulletin of a high standard (February 1998) to publicize its activities, as well as a leaflet in English and Nepali. Textbooks have been monitored for gender, socio-economic and regional equity.

105

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