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In this continuation of her account of riding to India, Murphy describes her travels in Tibet on Roz.  

1967

Murphy, Dervla (1931-).  The waiting land: a spell in Nepal.  London: John Murray, 1967.

{885841}

In 1965 Murphy spent seven months working with refugees and traveling through Nepal,

sometimes awheel her Russian built steed Leo.  She writes glowingly of the beauty,

despairingly of Western influences, and angrily about the poor conditions refugees must

endure.

O’Brien, Flann (1911-1966).  The third policeman.  London: McGibben & Gee, 1967.  

{1199517}

Written in 1939-1940, this novel does not appear until after O’Brien’s death.  It is a

black comedy about life and death, at one point the author theorizes  the personalities of

the rider and the bicycle become intertwined.

1968

McGonagle, Seamus (1938-).  The bicycle in life, love, war and literature.  London: Pelham

Books, 1968.  {18228}

1969

Bauer, Fred (1934-).  How many hills to Hillsboro.  Old Tappan, New Jersey:  Hewitt House,

1969.  {6448}

Together with his wife, daughter and two sons, one of whom rode in a bicycle seat on his

wheel, they planned to ride from New York to San Francisco in 1968, but ran out of time

in Springer, New Mexico after bicycling two thousand miles in eight weeks.

1970

Leete, Harley M.  The best of Bicycling!  New York: Trident Press, 1970.  {103950}

A collection of articles that originally appeared in the magazine, with a section on bicycle travelers.

Pierce, Desmond J.  Cycling is prohibited in this pleasure ground.  London: Regency Press, 1970.  {99795}

Woodforde, John. The story of the bicycle. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1970.  {117669}

1971

Harmond, Richard. “Progress and flight: An interpretation of the American bicycle craze of the 1890’s.” Journal of Social History, V (Winter, 1971-72), 235-57.

Harmond sees the bicycle as an escape from the tensions produced by industrialization and technology in the late nineteenth century.  Because of Americans’ interest in speed, it fell victim to technology itself with the introduction of the internal combustion engine.

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