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CHAPTER XI ­ BARBERS POINT, HAWAII - page 9 / 10

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Chapter XI Barbers Point, Hawaii

things to say about Sliker.

Sliker stood mute.

The Captain was about to render his judgment,

and I interrupted him, asking if I could have a say.

I informed the Captain about Sliker being

certified the best. It was now obvious that his division didn t see the school as an opportunity for their best candidate but as a chance to rid themselves of a goof­off for awhile. To them, the school was a shit detail like mess cooking or compartment cleaning where you sent your worse. I went on to tell him of how hard Sliker had worked and the long hours he had spent trying to live up to the title, est. The Captain dismissed all charges against Sliker and asked the Department Head, the Division Officer and the Leading Chief to remain after mast for a private little chat. He then asked me if I would like to have Sliker working for me. I told the Captain that I would be delighted. A little later Sliker told me that he would rather be transferred to

Midway Island than to stay in Hawaii.

Reluctantly I passed Slickers request on to the Captain.

Sli

s request was approved and he was transferred to Midway.

The same promotion list that

led to Slicker s downfall also authorized my promotion to First Class.

MY SON, RICHARD, IS BORN

On the 18th of December, 1956, not long after my promotion to First Class my son Richard Allen was born at Tripler Army Hospital, Oahu, Hawaii. He was named Richard Allen because that was the name picked out for Margaret Ann or her sister June Marie, had either of them been boys. Not long after Richard was born, I was ordered to attend the career counseling school in San Diego. Upon graduation I was assigned the position as a career counselor. I managed to do a passable job at it but my heart was with Margaret and the demands of a very sick daughter and a newborn son. I spent as much time as I could help Margaret Ann by washing diapers, making formula, and making emergency runs to the Sick Bay with Patti. The Sick Bay visit was often an all­day affair. The Doctor at the Sick Bay usually gave Patti a shot and had me take her to the Tripler Army Hospital.

The seriousness of Patti s illness became apparent not long after we were transferred to Hawaii. Her asthma attacks started coming more often and with greater severity. What started out as an asthma attack would often develop into pneumonia. Patti s prognosis was grave. One doctor predicted that she would never reach adulthood. None of them offered much hope.

Photo of Margaret Ann s silhouette taken aboard the S. S. Ainsworth by me.

WE RECEIVE ORDERS TO NAS MEMPHIS

Patti was about three when we received orders transferring us from Hawaii to Memphis. Patti s health was my number one concern in life. The Defense Department found that money

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