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Generations of readers have relished G. Polya's deft--indeed, brilliant--instructions on stripping away irrelevancies and going straight to the heart of the problem."

4.

Keys to Infinity. By Clifford A. Pickover.  (Wiley, 332 pp, 1995) GFBR****. Teen-Adult. "A treasure trove of recreational problems." (Martin Gardner) "What could be more appropriate to the subject of infinity than a book like this one, so dense with wonderful puzzles, anecdotes, images, and computer programs that you could pore over it forever?" Pickover is very, very creative and original.

5.

Knotted Doughnuts and Other Mathematical Entertainments. By Martin Gardner. (Freeman, 278 pp, 1986) GFBR ****. HS-Adult. One of his many collections of his columns from the Scientific Americans, and contains an entirely new set of problems, paradoxes, teasers and tricks. Investigates mathematical games such as Sim, Chomp, and Race Track; also investigates coincidences that seem to violate the laws of probability.  any book of his on mathematics or science would be fine. They are usually a collection of short articles on a variety of topics, and we can negotiate on how many articles you should read for your report.

6.

Math Wizardry for Kids. By Margaret Kenda and Phyllis S. Williams. (Barron's, 336 pp, 1995) Ages 8 to 12. Over 200 math puzzles, games and designs for kids, also available as a kit with a protractor, various triangles, a ruler, compass, and other essential tools.

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The Mathematics of Oz: Mental Gymnastics from Beyond the Edge. Clifford A. Pickover (Cambridge University Press, 2002 ) Teen-Adult. The author, “Dorothy, and Dr Oz explore some of the oddest and quirkiest highways and byways of the numerically obsessed. Prepare yourself for a shattering odyssey as The Mathematics of Oz unlocks the doors of your imagination. The thought-provoking mysteries, puzzles, and problems range from zebra numbers and circular primes to Legion’s number - a number so big that it makes a trillion pale in comparison. The strange mazes, bizarre consequences, and dizzying arrays of logic problems will entertain people at all levels of mathematical sophistication.  The tests devised by enigmatic Dr Oz to assess human intelligence will tease the brain of even the most avid puzzle fan.”

8.

Metamagical Themas: Questing for the Essence of Mind and Pattern. By Douglas R. Hofstadter (Basic, 880 pp, 1985) GFBR *****. Advanced HS-Adult. . A compilation of mathematical columns from Scientific American by the extremely original author of Godel, Escher, Bach.

9.

The Puzzling Adventures of Dr. Ecco. By Dennis Shasha. (Freeman, 181 pp, 1988) GFBR **. Advanced HS-Adult. "This is an extremely entertaining book written in a lively style. The problems and puzzles are unique and exciting. Dr. Ecco's Holmesian character is insightful and engaging. What is so delightful here is that the problems presented, in addition to being challenging, open up readers to significant and important areas of mathematics and their applications." Warning – these puzzles are NOT easy!

10.

Solve This. By James Stanton. (MAA, 240 pp, 2001) 8th grade-Adult. "The book has plenty of illustrations and lots of engaging problems, some of which would be suitable for bright 8th and 9th graders. Jim has contributed articles to Math Horizons which may be accessible online. This is a wonderful book for students and teachers alike. Sophisticated mathematics is made accessible to everyone. Written with humor, thoughtfulness and a real sense of where people have difficulties and how to get around them, Tanton puts his finger on the pleasures and promises of each problem. Not to be missed, no matter how experienced or inexperienced you are."

11.

Wonders of Numbers: Adventures in Math, Mind, and Meaning By Clifford A. Pickover (Oxford U Press, 352 pp, 2000) HS-Adult. “This book contains a delightful collection of mathematical puzzles in the tradition of Martin Gardner. There are Klingon Paths, Hexagonal Cats, Messages from the Stars, and Doughnut Loops. … The book is not all numbers. There

Science and Math Books You Can Read – page 26 out of 30

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