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Switzerland and LiechtensteinWT/TPR/S/208 Page 91

7.

The conclusion and implementation of Switzerland's bilateral agreement with the EC on the free movement of persons has significantly liberalized labour movement independently of services trade liberalization rules;  priority can no longer be given to residents over EC/EFTA nationals.  For third country nationals, the system of quotas with a fixed number of work permits and labour market need is still in place.  Legislation on the admission of auditors entered into force in 2007;  it established an oversight authority for auditing services and represented a move from self-regulation to a system of accreditation.

(2) Agriculture and Related Activities

(i) Overview and main features

1.

Around two thirds of the Swiss land area are suitable for agriculture, including forestry.  About half of the total area suitable for agriculture is cultivated land, of which mountainous areas account for slightly over one third;  about three fifths of the total are appropriate for animal grazing.  

2.

Liechtenstein had 133 farms in 2005, down from 199 in 2000.  Mostly smaller farms were given up.  About 5,400 hectares (including alps) are used for agricultural production.  Milk production is the most important agricultural activity, followed by vegetable farming, forestry, and wine-grapes.

3.

The contribution of agriculture to employment and GDP remains marginal in both Switzerland and Liechtenstein (Chapter I(1)).  In 2006, there were 62,800 farms in Switzerland, with an average size of 17 hectares.  Total annual agricultural production has fluctuated between Sw F 9 billion and Sw F 10 billion since 2001 (Table IV.1).  In value terms, production of milk is the most important, followed by cattle and pig breeding.  The major crops include cereals (wheat, maize, barley, and oats), potatoes, oilseeds, sugar beet, and fruit (apples, pears, plums, and grapes).  Switzerland's self-sufficiency ratios have remained stable for most products, but have declined for cereals and potatoes (Table IV.2).  Ratios are highest for dairy products and lowest for oils and vegetables.

Table IV.1

Swiss agricultural production, 2001-07

(Sw F million)

Branch

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007a

Total vegetable production

4,303.9

4,533.3

4,218.2

4,765.9

4,465.7

4,132.7

4,490.6

Cereals

487.3

504.8

410.6

492.8

448.3

439.8

415.7

Potatoes

191.8

187.7

183.1

170.6

177.1

171.4

170.9

Sugar beet

136.7

164.5

144.4

168.5

154.7

130.0

166.6

Other vegetables

473.5

504.0

547.4

538.3

530.2

522.0

528.8

Fruits

552.3

556.5

526.4

598.7

496.4

511.6

307.2

Wine

430.6

418.0

385.9

426.5

413.2

431.6

386.9

Plants and flowers

807.9

851.7

819.3

776.6

739.5

736.3

752.8

Total animal production

5,069.9

5,005.8

4,995.7

5,195.3

4,948.8

4,911.6

4907.2

Milk

2,613.8

2,546.4

2,420.7

2,114.2

2,336.2

2,306.6

2.233.8

Bovine

924.2

951.7

1,047.9

1,211.3

1,177.4

1,218.8

1.225.4

Porcine

1,082.0

1,033.3

1,058.3

1,088.1

975.3

959.9

1.002.2

Poultry

179.9

193.5

198.8

218.0

205.5

181.6

206.2

Eggs

180.5

188.7

183.1

177.5

179.5

176.4

173.8

Total agricultural production

9,373.8

9,539.1

9,213.9

9,961.2

9,414.5

9,044.3

9,397.8

aProvisional.

Source:Federal Office for Agriculture (various issues), Rapport agricole.  Viewed at:  http://www.blw.admin.ch/ dokumentation/00018/00103/index.html?lang=fr.

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