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Economic Development of Central America Econ. 4200 - Spring 2004 – Dr. Taylor - page 95 / 153

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 In 1962 and 1975, agrarian-reform laws were passed and put into effect with relative success. The Honduran government, with the aid of peasant organizations and organized labor, was able to resettle 30,000 families on their own land. Today, two thirds of the people who use the land either own it or have the legal right to its use.

The state has often shown a paternalistic face rather than a brutal, repressive one.

An alliance of the military and organized labor in the early 1970s produced a series of reforms in response to pressure from the less advantaged sectors of the population; in 1974, the military government developed a five-year plan to integrate the rural poor into the national economy and to increase social services in the area.

Honduran campesinos, according to Central America Report, "have had a long and combative history of struggling for land rights." In 1987, hundreds of peasants were jailed as "terrorists" as a result of land invasions. Occupation of privately owned lands has become increasingly common in Honduras and reflects both population pressure on and land hunger of the peasantry.

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