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Brassica : Harvesting the Genome, Diversity and Products

Changes in market requirements

There is increased interest in diversifying the Brassica-based oils available in the market place. This is primarily dependent upon modifying the fatty acid profiles to develop crops such as HERO (High erucic acid, for ...) and HILO (High linoleic acid).

2.1.2.2.

Vegetables

The total harvested area for Cabbage and Cauliflower is 3,160,792Ha. FAO statistics do not include or distinguish between many Brassica vegetable crops (Broccoli, Chinese cabbages et al.)

Cabbage

Area Harvested Ha

Yield (Hg/Ha)

Production (Mt)

China

1,621,050

170,741

27,678,001

India

280,000

217,857

6,100,000

Russian Fed'tion

180,000

222,222

4,000,000

Korea, Rep

44,409

580,029

2,575,849

Japan

56,000

427,143

2,392,000

USA

105,000

219,048

2,300,000

Indonesia

90,405

159,083

1,438,194

Poland

32,000

390,625

1,250,000

Ukraine

85,000

141,176

1,200,000

Uzbekistan

16,000

562,500

900,000

Romania

42,000

202,381

850,000

Turkey

32,000

229,688

735,000

Korea, Dem Peoples Rep

34,000

200,000

680,000

Germany

12,899

489,185

631,000

Egypt

20,000

285,000

570,000

World Total

3,160,792

62,001,881

Korea:Chinese Cabbage4,451,135; Krw 546 billion (£ 266 million)

Cauliflower

Area Harvested Ha

Yield (Hg/Ha)

Production (Mt)

China

353,616

183,405

6,485,502

India

260,000

184,615

4,800,000

Italy

24,053

209,415

503,705

France

27,000

145,185

392,000

USA

17,500

171,429

300,000

Spain

12,500

225,280

281,600

Pakistan

11,000

182,727

201,000

Mexico

18,000

111,111

200,000

Poland

10,000

200,000

200,000

UK

12,000

109,333

131,200

Germany

5,123

249,854

128,000

Australia

11,300

106,195

120,000

Japan

10,000

118,000

118,000

Egypt

4,500

244,444

110,000

World total

857,692

15,084,200

2.1.2.3.

Condiments

The Brassica species B. nigra, B. juncea and B. carinata are important mustard crops in sub-tropical regions of the world, including Northern Africa and the Indian sub-continent.  

2.1.2.4.

Fodder

Brassica kales and turnips have traditionally been used as fodder and forage crops.

2.1.3.

Diversity and specific adaptations for diverse environments and climate change

The area of the world's arable land is decreasing, whilst the human population continues to grow. There is increasing pressure to grow arable and other crops on land with marginal nutrition or water availability. The innate variation within the Brassica genepool should drive a concerted effort to understand the basis of adaptability. Access to the relevant genomic  resources and information will provide breeders with the necessary tools to select the optimal combinations of alleles adapted to local and changing growing environments.

Draft White Paper for Multinational Brassica Genome Project (MBGP);   12/01/2006

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