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Copy and cut out the role cards below, and give one to each pair of learners …

Role Card 1: ELDERLY PERSON WHO KNOWS AND USES PLANTS

You are an elderly person from the community who knows the uses of many indigenous plants that grow in the area. You collect some for food and others for medicine, and remember how your uncle used to make a living from repairing thatched roofs with local reeds. You believe that nature is an important part of your culture. You are afraid that people will lose a lot of their indigenous knowledge when the last natural area in your neighbourhood is destroyed. You want your grandchildren and their friends to know about the plants you grew up with and what they are used for, and to feel proud about the knowledge of their ancestors.

For more information, go to: Module 7: Nature and culture

Role Card 2: CHAIRPERSON OF THE LOCAL NATURALIST SOCIETY

You are a keen nature lover who runs the local naturalists’ society. You organise outings to the area to show children and adults from the community and other parts of Cape Town some of the plants and animals that live here. Even though the Table Mountain National Park conserves a very large area of nature in the City, some plants and animals live only in the lowlands and not on the mountain. As natural areas in the lowlands are developed, it becomes more and more difficult for these species to survive. You have identified two rare and endangered plants on the site which are not found anywhere else. If this site is developed, these species will be extinct in the wild. You are also concerned that, if this piece of veld is destroyed, it will also make it more difficult for even the common plants and animals to survive, as this is the last piece of natural habitat in your area.

For more information, go to: Module 9: Local ecology Module 5: Rare, threatened and extinct

Role Card 3:

LOCAL SCIENCE TEACHER

You are a science teacher from a local school. The natural area is within walking distance of the school and you take all your classes on field trips to this area. The learners have been keeping records of the plants and animals that live in the area. They also regularly conduct clean-up campaigns and have worked with the local council to build and maintain paths through the area. Since the school “adopted” this natural area, it frequently wins environmental competitions. It recently became an Eco-School and now flies its green flag with pride.

For more information, go to: Module 8: Adapting to the environment Educators’ Guide: Environmental education in the Curriculum

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