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in both industrialised and developing countries. Take steps to deliver structural change that is not a zero-sum game by making it possible to manage change in firms, industries, regions and labour markets in socially equitable ways.

29 We call on G8 members of the G20 to:

Meet commitments made in the L’Aquila Joint Statement on Global Food Security and move ahead with investments in the “expansion of employment and decent work opportunities, knowledge and training”. Improving access to food means tackling the prevailing model of agribusiness that has severely undermined rural livelihoods and communities in many countries.

CLIMAtE ChANGE: A ‘JUSt trANSItION’ FOr AN AMBItIOUS AND FAIr CLIMAtE ChANGE DEAL IN COpENhAGEN

30 G20 Leaders must ensure that the urgent measures needed to tackle climate change are not delayed or derailed by this crisis. Rather, govern- ments must use the coordinated global fiscal response to the crisis to move ahead with the ‘green economy agenda’, thus preparing the ground for an ambitious climate agreement in Copenhagen, in December.

31

These are essential steps if we are to prevent the world’s average tempera- ture rising more than 2 degrees and to avert widespread climate disaster: at best, the loss of 5 per cent global output “now and forever” according to the Stern report, or, at worst, the collapse of societies as predicted by current models of long-term environmental and economic interactions. It is essential that the G20 meeting sends a strong message on the need to reach an agreement in Copenhagen. Such an agreement must include ambitious targets with binding commitments for Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emission reduction in developed countries, as well as effective action for achieving GHG emission reduction or controlled increases to bring about low carbon development in developing countries.

32 Governments must be aware that reaching such an agreement on climate change depends on building a broad and sustainable political consensus on goals, as well as the means of achieving them. They must recognise the social and economic impacts of the agreement and have a clear strategy in place for addressing them. This strategy should be built around the concept of “just transition”. “Just transition” requires governments to take steps to smooth the shift towards a more sustainable society by building the capacity of the “green economy” to sustain jobs and livelihoods for all. Just transition requires inter alia, major investments to develop long-term sustainable industrial policies, aimed at retaining and creating decent and “green”/sustainable jobs, “greening” all workplaces and developing and deploying technology; consulting with unions and employers; supporting training provision for workers; and the implementation of social protec- tion and economic diversification policies.

33 There is an urgent need for developed countries to support adaptation in developing countries and to provide funding and technical support for developing, renewing and deploying new low carbon technologies. This includes the provision of capacity-building and re-training for workers.

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