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American Presidential Banqueting

Sixty Saddle of Mutton Eight Rounds of Beef Seventy-five Hams Four Saddles of Venison Four Hundred Gallons of Oysters Five Hundred Quarts of Chicken Salad One Hundred Twenty-Five Tongues Five Hundred Quarts of Jellies Twelve Hundred Quarts of Ice Cream in Assorted Flavors Cake Pyramid: Four Feet High decorated with the Flags of 31 States and Territories

. Figure 1.15 , PURCHASING REQUIREMENTS FOR

BUCHANAN’S INAUGURAL BALL MENU (Source: Cannon and Brooks, The President’s Cookbook, 1968, p. 221)

ied foods. Roast ham, a saddle of venison or some other heavy roast, roast wild ducks, or other poultry was in evidence. Enormous supplies of home- made cakes and puddings were on hand. Punch, madeira, and the ubiquitous champagne were ready. Such galas usually began around eight o’clock and ended at eleven.13

. PRESIDENT JAMES BUCHANAN ,

James Buchanan brought the formal elegance of European society back to the White House, enlisting a French caterer named Gautuer to reign over the White House kitchen. Figure 1.15 itemizes the purchasing arrangements to fill the menu for Buchanan’s inaugural ball, to which 5,000 guests were invited on March 4, 1857.

. PRESIDENT ABRAHAM LINCOLN ,

President Lincoln’s second inaugural ball in 1865 was not to be overshadowed by the ongoing Civil War. The menu in Figure 1.16 reflects the diverse cuisine styles of the first 100 years of the American presidency, combining the nation’s bounty of foods so evident at Washington’s table with the influences of French cuisine.

At the beginning of the twentieth century, the formal seven-course French menu in Figure 1.17 was served on the occasion of a state dinner at the White House.

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