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Lodz-Names: List of the Ghetto Inhabitants, 1940-1944 - page 3 / 8

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Lodz Ghetto Database

Page 3 of 8

German or Polish ABG + date

Abbreviations in Lodz Names English Change of registration to new address

AG or A.G. + date

Change of registration to new address, or deportation (to Chełmno); AG may be used as an abbreviation of either "Abgang" or "Ausgang"

AGE A.M. ANG AUSG + date AUSG TR + date DO DOM GEST OMYLK WPIS PRZ do M + No. PRZ dom + No. S. SIEHE UBERMEL UM UMG WYM + date ZAM ZMARL

(unknown) (unknown) Change of registration to new address Deportation (to Chełmno) Deportation with transport number (to Chełmno) Domicile Domicile Died Mistaken entry Moved to moved to app. no. in same house Moved to other house in same street See, compare See, compare Relocated Relocated, moved Relocated, moved Change of registration to new address Zameldowane = Registered in Died

In the ninth column, Notes, German or Polish abbreviations are used to denote the movements or fate of the individual, as on the following chart:

Comments

This database was created by Alexander Avraham at Yad Vashem, Jerusalem, Israel. Alex comments:

The original data contains two, some people say three, official censuses/registrations within the ghetto between 1941-1944 (there are even records where the year 1945 is stated). That is why some inmates appear two or three times within the 242,000 records. Sometimes one can say exactly when there is a double record for the same person, sometimes not, because mispellings/distortions or differences in (birth) dates. It seems that at the time of the data entry, an attempt was made to "de-duplicate" double registrations, but obviously it did not succeed entirely. We have decided to stick with the file as it is and state in a disclaimer that double entries might appear for the same person.

The big problem is that in the original file, the records consist not of separate fields, but of mere lines where the different pieces of information are separated by spaces (not tabs) with no mark for missing items, which causes inconsistence. Due to similarity in the type of items (i.e. last names and maiden names, three possible sets of addresses in similar format, dates for record modification, deportation and death), it was very difficult to structure the data in a column/field strandard pattern. That is why it took so long to compile this database: one has to know by heart the geography of the ghetto street by street, hospital by old age home, as well as other street names and cities, to decypher the abbreviations and their true meaning out of a lot of folk stories and contradicting expert advise. I had to ask a lot of people/survivors and to go many times to the microfilm of the original records in order to understand the logic of the actual registration on forms that changed from census to census. I had to go over tens of thousands of records manually because any subsets I would select would inevitably include hundreds of exceptions I had to handle manually.

The notations census were made in German and/or Polish, there are a lot of erasures, illegible items and wrong entries and all of this is reflected in the digital file. Notations pertinent to these issues appear in the Notes field, mostly without translation.

A few persons (15-20) appeared not as independent records but by mistake their data was superimposed on the last items of the previous record: I made a new entry for them and made a "remiza" in the Notes pointing to the source record; they appear also in the Notes of the original record itself as registered.

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5/13/2008

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