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to meet future requirements.21  Failure to meet these provisions subjected the state to termination of federal financial assistance.22

Initially, a state could be eligible for funding by submitting a proposal to the Council setting forth the planning it proposed to undertake, the financial and technical assistance required, the anticipated time necessary to complete such planning and the estimated cost of those activities.23  The federal grant, if approved, would cover two-thirds of the state's expenses for the first three years; thereafter, the grants were reduced to one-half.24  All grants would be made in addition to any other planning money the state was already receiving under other federal programs.25  Additionally, once a state had submitted a proposal for a planning grant, or had adopted a land use plan, all federal agencies, conducting or supporting public works activities in an area subject to a state plan, were required to comply with the provisions of that plan, unless there were overriding national policy considerations.26

    (Id. at §406(c)(2).

    (Id. at §406(d).

    (Id. at §404(a).

    (Id. at §404(b).  

    (Id. at §404(d).  Planning money was primarily provided to states under the 701 assistance program of the Housing Act of 1954.  (40 U.S.C. § 460 - 62) (1970).  The 701 program was developed to encourage planning including surveys, land use studies, urban renewal plans, and technical services.  William K. Reilly, New Directions in Federal Land Use Legislation, Urban Law Annual at 34 (1973).

    (Senate Bill 3354, supra note 7, §408(b).  

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