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period, in which 2 or more treatments were compared with a control group, are used to evaluate the quality of such research. The statistical conclusion; internal, external, and construct validity; nonreproducible accounts of treatments; inadequate description of Ss, therapists, and design features; and faulty data presentation are discussed. This meta-analysis underlines the urgent need for greater methodological diversity and clinical realism in therapy research.

Improving the effectiveness of mental health services.

Bickman, L. (2008). Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 35(3), 229.

[Correction Notice: An erratum for this article was reported in Vol 35(3) of Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research (see record 2008-06221-012). This introduction should have been included in Volume 35, Number 1 (January 2008).] As a journal that focuses on administration, policy, and mental health services it is my pleasure to present this special issue that is on improving mental health services through closing the well publicized gap between research and practice.  

'Improving the effectiveness of mental health services': Erratum.

Bickman, L. (2008). Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 35(3).

Reports an error in "Improving the effectiveness of mental health services" by Leonard Bickman (Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 2008[May], Vol 35[3], 229). This introduction should have been included in Volume 35, Number 1 (January 2008). (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2008-06221-011). As a journal that focuses on administration, policy, and mental health services it is my pleasure to present this special issue that is on improving mental health services through closing the well publicized gap between research and practice.

Effectiveness of time-limited psychotherapy for minor psychiatric disorders: Randomised controlled trial evaluating immediate v. long-term effects.

Blay, S., Vel Fucks, J., Barruzi, M., Di Pietro, M., Gastal, F., Neto, A. (2002). British Journal of Psychiatry, 180(5), 416-422.

Psychotherapy research rarely has studied outcome in the longer term. This study evaluated the effectiveness of brief group dynamic psychotherapy (BGDP) intervention in patients with minor psychiatric disorders compared with the usual clinical management shortly after treatment termination and investigated whether intervention would show a differential effect at 2-yr follow-up. Patients were allocated randomly to an experimental or control group. The General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) was used as a primary outcome measure. Based on improvement in the GHQ, at termination of treatment the BGDP group showed a significant improvement in 23 out of 42 (54.8%) compared with 11 out of 41 (26.8%) in the clinical management group. The difference in the total improvement rate is 28%. In contrast, no differential follow-up effects were found between the BGDP and clinical management groups. The authors conclude that psychotherapy appears to have beneficial effects at termination of treatment but the changes attained were not stable

From symptom relief to interpersonal change: Treatment outcome and effectiveness in inpatient psychotherapy.

Haase, M., Frommer, J., Franke, G., Hoffmann, T., Schulze-Muetzel, J., Jäger, S. (2008). Psychotherapy Research, 18 (5), 615-624.

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