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FIGURE 4

United States: High-Speed Rail Corridor Designations

Vancouver, B.C.

Seattle Tacoma

Portland Salem

Eugene

PACIFIC NORTHWEST CORRIDOR

Minneapolis

St. Paul

KEYSTONE CORRIDOR

NORTHERN NEW ENGLAND CORRIDOR

Montreal Montpelier Portland Concord EMPIRE CORRIDOR Boston

Albany

Milwaukee

Buffalo

Detroit

Sacramento

San Francisco

Fresno

CALIFORNIA CORRIDOR

CHICAGO HUB CORRIDOR Chicago

Kansas City

St. Louis

New York Cleveland Harrisburg Toledo Pittsburgh Philadelphia Columbus Baltimore NORTHEAST CORRIDOR Indianapolis Washington, D. C. Cincinnati

Louisville

Richmond Hampton Roads

Los Angeles

San Diego

Oklahoma City

SOUTH CENTRAL CORRIDOR

Austin

Texarkana

Birmingham

Dallas/ Fort Worth

Meridian

Mobile

Jacksonville

Macon Savannah

Tulsa

Little Rock

SOUTHEAST CORRIDOR

Atlanta

Raleigh

Charlotte Greenville

Columbia

(not shown, other potential high-speed rail corridors, including the Alaska Railroad)

High Speed Rail Corridor (Department of Transportation 2000)

San Antonio

Houston

New Orleans

Orlando

Selected existing inter-city Amtrak routes

Suggested areas to phase out air trips of less than 350 miles

GULF COAST CORRIDOR

Tampa

FLORIDA CORRIDOR

Miami

West Palm Beach

The Mission Ahead

The need to build the above projects, combined with the threatened shut-down of auto plants, defines the urgent necessity for retooling. It will also evoke the best thinking and qualities of the workers. The UAW official at Delphi, cited above, explained that when there is a product change, his plant has undergone retooling, an occurrence that is familiar to auto workers. He described that they must engage in a deliberative process. “First, we need to know what is the product to be produced. Second, we look at the plant’s capa- bilities as far as equipment is concerned, so we know our ability to produce it. Third, you’re going to arrange money for an initial investment.” Told of LaRouche’s plan for long- term credit at 1-2% interest rates, he said, “That’s what would do it. That would work.” He added, “We have taken so many courses on lean manufacturing, we would know how to arrange and re-arrange a plant. We have plenty of available space.”

The Mansfield, Ohio UAW representative at GM brought another insight to the discussion. His factory, which stretches over 54 acres, deploys in-house 22 transfer presses, which are

immense machine-tools—weighing between 100 tons and several thousand tons apiece—which have significant techno- logical capabilities, and would be key in retooling. He described the retooling process: “It starts in the die shop. We’ll get drawings for a product that will be produced. Our die mak- ers will cast a block [of metal] and then cut it down to make a complete set of dies.” He added, “We have 350 to 400 work- ers in this die shop. Some are among the sharpest skilled tradesmen in the world.” This group of 350-400 tool and die workers, were it on its own, would be a very large machine- tool shop all by itself.

Each of the workers in this discussion with the LaRouche movement, is at a plant with extensive capabilities, and each possesses a knowledge of what the re-tooling process involves. In the course of the discussions, once they conceptu- alized that LaRouche’s retooling proposal was eminently doable, they were excited to realize that the auto sector does not have to shut down. By accelerating adoption of LaRouche’s emergency plan, we can give thousands of skilled and semi-skilled employees the opportunity to do what must be done.

36 Economics

EIR

May 6, 2005

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