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THE NATION’S NEWSPAPER

Collegiate Case Study

www.usatodaycollege.com

A more energy-efficient home can turn up the heat on your savings

By Sandra Block ...................................................................................4-5

One family takes on carbon dioxide

By Tom Kenworthy ...................................................................................6-7

Americans are going ‘green’

The trend toward “eco-friendly” construction and design has taken hold across the USA in recent years and is currently rising to a new level. Consumer interest in “green” buildings and other environmentally-friendly and efficient products and innovations is at an all-time high. Families and businesses alike are taking steps to improve their “green ethics” — from installing energy-effi- cient appliances to constructing offices with state-of-the art ventilation sys- tems. This case study explores the green movement across America.

Brrracing for winter

By Kathy Chu ..................................................................................8-9

Buildings designed in cool shades of green

By John Ritter ......................................................................................10-12

Disscussion questions and future implications

............................................................................................13

USA TODAY Snapshots® Hybrid car sales accelerate 2000

7,781 2001

How the number of gas-electric hybrid cars registered nationally has risen:

19,963

2002

35,934

2003

45,943

2004

83,153

Source: R.L. Polk & Co.

Building ‘green’ reaches a new level

Portland leads the way as ‘eco-friendly’ construction has gone mainstream

By John Ritter USA TODAY

PORTLAND, Ore. — Michelle Walsh looks out a wall of windows in her airy new condo high above the Willamette River. Across hills and forests loom snow- capped Mount Hood and, when it's clear, Mount St. Helens. Below? Construction chaos all around.

Walsh revels in it. She and her husband, Edward, proudly wear "urban pioneer" buttons the builder handed out to early move-ins at the nation's first

large-scale redevelopment to go 100%

"green."

Call

it

" e c o - f r i e n d l y. "

Call

it

"sustainable." Portland's $2.2 billion South Waterfront project, rising on a decaying industrial site south of downtown, signals a watershed in the green-building boom.

A trend that has taken hold across the USA in the past few years is evolving to a new level. What has been a patchwork of green buildings in many cities is expanding to whole communities, whole neighborhoods. Portland, well known as an urban-design innovator, particularly for its transit-oriented developments, is leading the way again.

The green ethic — energy-efficient, water-stingy buildings full of features that stress the natural over the chemical, the recycled over the new and the renewable over the finite — is firmly mainstream.

"The big developers, the people who

By Mark Pearson and Marcy E. Mullins, USA TODAY

© Copyright 2006 USA TODAY, a division of Gannett Co., Inc. All rights reserved.

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