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16 | Agriculture Fact Book | Chapter 2

Unit

1950-59

1960-69

1970-79

1980-89

lb

703

619

548

573

lb

7.7

9.5

14.4

21.5

lb

3.9

4.6

4.9

4.1

lb

23.0

27.5

27.8

27.4

lb

18.1

18.3

17.7

17.7

lb

2.7

6.2

7.6

7.2

lb

1.3

1.5

1.5

1.3

lb

1.0

1.5

1.0

1.2

lb

4.9

5.9

4.1

2.4

lb

.2

.6

2.1

3.2

lb

21.6

15.7

9.4

7.5

/2 pt

18.1

13.3

10.1

12.8

/2 pt

0.2

0.7

3.2

6.5

Per capita annual averages

Table 2–2

Americans are drinking less milk, eating more cheese

Frozen dairy products Ice cream Lowfat ice cream Sherbet Other (including frozen yogurt)

Nonfat dry milk Dry whey Condensed and evaporated milks

Cream products Yogurt

1 1

Item All dairy products Cheese2 Cottage cheese

1

gal

36.4

32.6

29.8

26.5

gal

33.5

28.8

21.7

14.3

gal

2.9

3.7

8.1

12.2

Beverage milk Whole Lower fat

Note: Totals may not add due to rounding. 1Milk-equivalent, milkfat basis; includes butter. Individual items are on a product-weight basis.

2Natural equivalent of cheese and cheese products; excludes full-skim American, cottage, pot, and baker’s cheese. Source: USDA’s Economic Research Service.

1990-99

2000

571

593

26.7

29.8

2.9

2.6

28.8

27.8

16.0

16.5

7.5

7.3

1.3

1.2

4.0

3.1

3.1

3.4

3.5

3.4

7.3

5.8

15.7

18.6

8.5

9.9

24.3

22.6

9.1

8.1

15.3

14.5

of fat in the U.S. food supply from meat, poultry, and fish declined from 33 per- cent in the 1950s to 24 percent in 2000. Similarly, the proportion of saturated fat contributed by meat, poultry, and fish fell from 33 percent in the 1950s to 26 percent in 2000.

in consumption of salty snack foods fa- vored soft drink consumption.

The beverage milk trend is toward lower fat milk. Whole milk represented 92 per- cent of all beverage milk (plain, flavored, and buttermilk) in the 1950s, but its share dropped to 36 percent in 2000.

Eating Out Cuts Milk, Boosts Cheese Consumption…

In 2000, Americans drank an average of 38 percent less milk and ate nearly four times as much cheese (excluding cot- tage, pot, and baker’s cheese) as in the 1950s (table 2-2).

Consumption of beverage milk declined from an annual average of 36 gallons per person in the 1950s to less than 23 gal- lons in 2000. Consumption of soft drinks, fruit drinks and ades, and flavored teas may be displacing beverage milk in the diet. Big increases in eating away from home, especially at fast-food places, and

Average annual consumption of cheese (excluding full-skim American and cot- tage, pot, and baker’s cheeses) increased 287 percent between the 1950s and 2000, from 7.7 pounds per person to 29.8 pounds. Lifestyles that emphasize con- venience foods were probably major forces behind the higher consumption. In fact, more than half of our cheese now comes in commercially manufactured and pre- pared foods (including food service), such as pizza, tacos, nachos, salad bars, fast- food sandwiches, bagel spreads, sauces for baked potatoes and other vegetables, and packaged snack foods. Advertising and new products—such as reduced-fat cheeses and resealable bags of shredded

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