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Designing and Implementing an Effective Tobacco Counter-Marketing Campaign

Table 3.5: Pros and Cons of Survey Formats

Format

Pros

Cons

Mail

  • Mail can be a cost-effective way to access hard-to-reach popu- lations (e.g., the homebound or rural residents).

  • Respondents can answer ques- tions when it’s most convenient for them.

  • Mail is not appropriate for respondents with limited literacy skills.

  • Low response rate diminishes the value of results.

  • Expensive follow-up by mail or telephone may be necessary to increase the response rate.

  • Respondents may return incomplete questionnaires.

  • Responses can be difficult to read.

  • Receiving enough responses may take a long time.

  • Postage may be expensive if the sample is large or the question- naire is long.

Telephone

With interviewer using paper-and-pencil ques- tionnaires.

  • Telephone is appropriate for those with limited literacy skills.

  • Questionnaires can be more complete.

  • The sequence of questions can

be controlled.

  • Potential respondents without telephones can’t participate.

  • Respondents may hang up if they believe the survey is part of a solicitation call or if they don’t want to take the time to participate.

  • Response rates are declining, especially for telephone and Internet surveys (Singer, et al.

    • 2000)

      .

With interviewer using computer-assisted telephone interviewing (CATI).

  • “Skip patterns” can be included, which is useful for complex questionnaires.

  • The need for data entry is eliminated.

  • CATI software and computers are required.

  • Extensive interviewer training is needed.

  • Time is required to program

questionnaire into CATI.

Continues

Chapter 3: Gaining and Using Target Audience Insights

79

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