X hits on this document

Word document

Modernizing General Chemistry for the Year 2050: Why Are General Chemistry - page 5 / 13

67 views

0 shares

0 downloads

0 comments

5 / 13

The responses demonstrated more detailed expectations of student knowledge of quantum concepts than was apparent from the ranking of chemical concepts. If we combine the responses to the first two questions, then 5/6 instructors list orbitals and bonding theory under the quantum concepts they expect their students to master. The concomitant concepts that support these two were explicitly mentioned less frequently (3/6 Pauli Principle, 3/6 quantum numbers, 2/6 energy levels), but it is not unreasonable to assume that these concepts are embedded with orbitals and bonding. 4/6 of the instructors were explicit about the relationship between these quantum concepts and the Periodic Table. Somewhat more surprising was the lack of mention of spectroscopy (3/6) and the wave nature of light (1/6). The particle nature of light was also little referred to (2/6).

Concept/

Respondent

Energy

Levels

Orbitals

Bonding

Theory

Heisen-

berg

Principle

Pauli

Principle

Periodicity

Quantum

Numbers

Bohr

atom

Spectro-scopy

EM

particle nature - photons

Wave

nature

of

light

1

X

X

X

2

X

X

X

X

3

X

X

X

X

4

X

X

X

X

X

5

X

X

X

X

X

X

6

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Table II

It is possible that the respondents interpreted the word “concept” differently. A tighter definition would make periodicity a quantum outcome, not a quantum concept. Similarly, bonding theory is an outcome as well. The inclusion of the Bohr atom shows the resilience of the older quantum theory that was discredited by empirical evidence and the later successful quantum theory of Schrödinger and Heisenberg.

3. Unifying Model for the Instructor – Making Connections

We asked the instructors “whether you find that these quantum concepts provide a unifying model for your teaching?” Here we were probing for unity in the respondents’ instructional approach.

Instructor R2 interpreted this question as referring to the unifying theme behind his method of instruction, as opposed to the underlying scientific model linking together the scientific concepts. The other five of the instructors qualified their responses but acknowledged that at least a subset of their course was unified by quantum concepts.

R1: “I am unsure what is meant by ‘unifying model’ for my teaching. I think that these concepts certainly unify what I teach about atoms, ions, and molecules and relates directly to molecular geometry and transition metal chemistry. I do not see clear connections to other areas of chemistry that I cover in general chemistry.”

R3: “Bonding is a very central concept and in that sense I guess that quantum mechanics is a unifying principle. Much of the rest of the course does not require any knowledge of quantum so in a course or sequence sense I would say no but in the section related to bonding (end of first semester) I would say yes.”

R4: “I do not think that these concepts are developed fully enough in a typical general chemistry class (I mean by me) to constitute a unifying model. I just don’t understand the concepts deeply enough to draw a complete picture of how quantum theory explains common macroscopic chemical behavior.”

Garik & Kelley (draft)page 5

NARST 2005

Document info
Document views67
Page views68
Page last viewedWed Jan 18 11:02:56 UTC 2017
Pages13
Paragraphs319
Words6174

Comments