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Parameter Sensitivity in Hydrologic Modeling - page 11 / 163

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Chapter 1: Introduction

Hydrology, as defined by the 2001 Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) Hydraulic Design Manual, “deals with estimating flood magnitudes as the result of precipitation.” Estimating the magnitude of an extreme flood event is essential in the design of highway drainage facilities such as culverts, bridges,

storm drain systems, and detention determination of the quantity of water

storage expected

facilities. The time-dependent to be conveyed by each structure

is

used

as

a

guide

when

designing

the

structure

so

that

peak

flows

associated

with

an

extreme

flooding

event

do

not

cause

flooding

in

areas

adjacent

to

the

structure

and the road. extreme flood

With proper design of event are minimized.

these

facilities,

damages

resulting

from

an

The principal factors affecting flood magnitudes in a watershed include runoff (influenced by precipitation and abstractions), watershed area information

(slope, longest flow path, systems, flow diversions, development also influence

area), land use, and soil type.

Detention storage

channelization, and the magnitude of an

impervious cover from urban extreme flood event. Currently,

TxDOT

relies

heavily

on

manual

techniques

to

locate

drainage

divides

and

to

estimate hydrologic parameters such and abstrations. These parameters are

as flow path length, watershed area, slope, necessary in determining the peak discharge

at an area outlet, although the contributing watershed

many runoff estimation and the watershed slope

techniques assume the size as the principal variables.

of

1

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