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the Ogdens’ completion of plans for at least 50 flats buildings, 33 tenements, and 16 apartment houses. Some of these buildings, of course, may not have ultimately been built, and many have been demolished. See “Out Among the Builders” for the following dates: January 5, 1884, p. 7; July 5, 1884, p. 722; July 12, 1884, p. 743; September 20, 1884, p. 953; October 11, 1884, p. 1027; November 1, 1884, p. 1106; November 15, 1884, p. 1152; December 6, 1884, p. 1226; December 13, 1884, p. 1255; June 27, 1885, p. 734; July 11, 1885, p. 785; September 12, 1885, p. 1000; September 26, 1885, p. 1050; October 17, 1885, p. 1136; November 7, 1885, p. 1225; December 5, 1885, p. 1338; January 2, 1886, p. 11; January 23, 1886, p. 102; February 20, 1886, p. 225; March 6, 1886, pp. 287-88; March 20, 1886, p. 355; April 10, 1886, pp. 458-59; April 17, 1886, pp. 495-96; April 24, 1886, pp. 535-36; May 1, 1886, p. 569-70; May 8, 1886, p. 605; May 22, 1886, p. 679; May 29, 1886, p. 713; June 12, 1886, p. 774; and June 26, 1886, p. 833.

69 “Out Among the Builders,” September 26, 1885. For the purpose of comparison, the average value of a three- or four-story “second-class” multiple dwelling in the 1870s was about $10,000, according to Elizabeth Cromley, Alone Together: A History of New York’s Early Apartments (Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1990), p. 66.

70 At a cost of approximately $50,000, the building, according to the Real Estate Record and Builders’ Guide, would be “cabinet trimmed in the parlors and dining rooms, and have an elevator, steam heat, electric bells, and all conven- iences” (“Out Among the Builders,” May 22, 1886).

71 A.B. Ogden & Son designed a row of three houses at 51, 53, and 55 East 91st Street that were constructed in 1884 and sit today within the Carnegie Hill Historic District. Also within the Carnegie Hill District are 48, 50, 52, and 54 East 91st Street, three rowhouses by Ogden’s firm that were constructed in 1885-86. For stables designed by the Ogdens, see “Out Among the Builders” in Real Estate Record & Builders’ Guide for July 12, 1884, January 2, 1886, and April 17, 1886. The store-and-lofts building is described in the Tribeca East Historic District Designation Re- port. Industrial structures designed by the firm during these years included the five-story silk-finishing factory mentioned above (“Out Among the Builders,” December 13, 1884); a six-story store building at 184 Chrystie Street (“Out Among the Builders,” October 17, 1885); a six-story store building at 33½ Stanton Street (“Out Among the Builders,” March 20, 1886); a five-story factory on the north side of 56th Street, 300 feet west of Second Avenue (“Out Among the Builders,” April 17, 1886); and a five-story silk factory on the south side of 91st Street, 221 feet east of First Avenue (“Out Among the Builders,” June 26, 1886). Again, although it was reported in the Record and Builders’ Guide that the Ogdens had designed these buildings, they may not, of course, have ultimately been built, and many have likely been demolished.

72 “Out Among the Builders,” February 20, 1886. This building was completed, according to the New York City New Building dockets, on July 27, 1887 (NB 1886-645).

73 Construction date for 125 Riverside Drive is from the Office for Metropolitan History’s Manhattan Building Per- mits Database (accessed online at www.metrohistory.com); information on the Alba Hotel is from LPC, Midtown West Survey (New York: City of New York, December 1979), p. 148.

74 While Ogden’s office remained listed at 954 Lexington Avenue in Brooklyn city directories until 1912, his pro- fession was not listed as “architect” in the 1910 Census. The Architects’ Directory and Specification Index (New York: William T. Comstock) lists S.B. Ogden & Company in its 1905 edition, but the firm does not appear in the Directory’s 1913-14 edition. According to the Office for Metropolitan History’s Manhattan Building Permits Data- base, S.B. Ogden & Company submitted its last filing for a Manhattan building in 1909.

75 Sources for this section include Pianos and Their Makers, History of the American Piano-Forte, and Nancy Groce, Musical Instrument Makers of New York: A Directory of Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Craftsmen (Stuyvesant, N.Y.: Pendragon Press, 1991). Much of the information in this section relating to the Welte Company, George B. Gittins, and the history of the Estey Piano Company between approximately 1917 and 1929 is drawn from pp. 51-101 of the exhaustive book by Charles Davis Smith, The Welte Mignon: Its Music and Musicians (Ves- tal, N.Y.: Vestal Press for the Automatic Musical Instrument Collectors’ Association, 1994).

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