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In conclusion, a novel course format met multiple needs simultaneously. Additional chemistry was added to the engineering curriculum to better address its increased importance to the challenges today’s engineers face in the workplace. Providing a better chemical foundation for the principles being presented enhanced the materials science content. Lab experiences were added and greatly enriched the course. Team teaching by two departments allows the content to be covered in appropriate technical depth while keeping the focus and emphasis of the course such that it is interesting and engaging to engineering students.

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JENNIFER J. VAN ANTWERP is an Assistant Professor of Engineering at Calvin College. She has an M.S. (1997) and Ph.D. (1999) in Chemical Engineering, from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, with research in biotechnology. Her current research interests include diversity in engineering education and first-year engineering programs.

JEREMY G. VAN ANTWERP is an Assistant Professor of Engineering at Calvin College. He has an M.S. (1997) and Ph.D. (1999) in Chemical Engineering, from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research interests include control of large scale sheet and film processes, bilinear matrix inequalities, and engineering education.

DOUGLAS A. VANDER GRIEND is an Assistant Professor of Chemistry at Calvin College. He has an M.S. (1997) and Ph.D. (2000) in Inorganic Chemistry, from Northwestern University, with research in solid state and materials chemistry. His present research interests include supramolecular assembly of discrete and infinite coordination networks and inorganic thermochromic materials.

W. WAYNE WENTZHEIMER is a Professor of Engineering at Calvin College. He has an M.S.Ch.E. (1966) and Ph.D. (1969) from the University of Pennsylvania. Before joining Calvin in 1998, he had a 30 year industrial career, retiring as a R&D executive. He continues to work in the area of chemical process technology as a consultant.

Proceedings of the 2004 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright © 2004, American Society for Engineering Education

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