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Xai-Xai IDP – TOURISM DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK

FAO-PAP/RAC-MICOA

1985

1993

1994

1995

1996

1985

1993

1994

1995

1996

Eastern

1.78

3.44

3.66

3.97

4.32

445

1273

1535

1639

1895

Middle

0.26

0.30

2.76

0.34

0.33

78

110

121

116

118

Northern

5.20

8.83

8.14

7.25

7.19

1323

2415

2585

2521

2731

Southern

1.28

4.38

4.93

5.93

6.12

469

1543

1689

2073

2238

Western

1.19

1.43

1.47

1.55

1.63

286

640

600

631

675

arrivals by the year 2000, and 36 million by 2010. The latest information for 1996 indicates 19.6 million arrivals and receipts of US$ 7.6 billion.

Mozambique, Zimbabwe and Zambia have been classified as East African destinations. However, as far as their visitor flows are concerned, in particular in southern Mozambique, they are more dependent upon the Southern African Region. Trends by African regions in the period from 1985 to 1996 are given in Table 1 below.

Receipts (US$ million)

Table 1

Trends by African Regions (1985-1996)

Region

Arrivals (million)

(source: WTO)

Between 1994 and 1995, Southern Africa was the fastest growing destination, both for arrivals (+17.4%) and receipts (+14.2%). For the period 1990 to 1995, foreign visitor arrivals have grown by 23.4% per annum, on average. This growth was fuelled by a buoyant leisure and business traffic to South Africa. The share of Southern Africa in total arrivals in Africa raised from 13.5% in 1990 to 39% in 1995. The mass tourism flows in Southern Africa arise from movements between countries in this sub-region which have grown to almost 3 million in 1993, as well as arrivals of tourists coming from Eastern African countries which have risen to a little over 1 million in 1993.

In 1996, the Southern African Region grew by 3.1 % in terms of arrivals, and by 8% for receipts. This reduced growth rate is attributed to South Africa being perceived as an unsafe destination,

while foreign visitors to Zimbabwe grew by 14%, and its tourism equivalent values for Zambia were 5.5% and 4.3%, respectively.

receipts

by

42.2%.

The

2.2.2 Origins of Tourism Flows

Over the past decade there has been a marked increase in intraregional travelling (Africans travelling to other African countries) on the African continent. Table 2 illustrates this phenomenon and also shows the contribution made by interregional travelling (non-Africans travelling to African countries).

Intraregional

1980 24

1990 38

2000 40

2010 42

Interregional (source: WTO)

76

62

60

58

Table 2

African Tourism Flows (Trends And Forecasts in %)

The leading motivators attributed to the European leisure tourist to Africa, are:

  • The ‘wilderness experience’, of which the component of wildlife (especially the large

mammals) is predominant;

  • Beach, climate, culture; and

  • Visiting friends and relatives.

14

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