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  • Bereavement: the objective situation of having lost someone

significant through death

  • Grief: the primarily emotional (affective) reactions to the loss

of a loved one through death

    • Mourning: the public display of grief, the social expressions or acts that are shaped by the (often religious) beliefs and practices of a given society or cultural group (p5)

  • 4.

    Within this document the term “those who have been bereaved

has been used to denote those people who were close to the deceased and are significantly affected by the death. While this may normally be family members or other carers, it is recognised that this is not always the case. It is also recognised that staff who cared for the deceased may be among those who experience bereavement following a death.

5.

The aim of bereavement care has been defined in general terms

(Schut et al 2001) as;

“… to benefit the bereaved individual, to help him or her deal with the emotional and practical problems following the loss of a loved one” (p705) Shaping Bereavement Care adopts the assumption used by Stephen et al (2006) that the term “bereavement care”,

may cover a spectrum of services from informal and formal befriending approaches, to care provided by health and social care practitioners before, at the point of death and beyond, to that provided by mental health practitioners for those who develop complicated grief(p4)

6.

One of the few certainties we face is that life is finite and that every

person will experience

one day of all of

die.

us

as

That being so, grief and bereavement are the

we

face

the

death

of

colleagues,

friends

and

family.

The very routine of birth-life-death, however, stands in contrast

Shaping Bereavement Care 8

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