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11.

WHERE and WHEN should it be delivered?

Education and training settings, for example:

can

be

made

available

to

staff

in

a

variety

of

  • Planned education programmes as well as specific training according to assessment of need e.g. sudden death in A and E

  • In any setting, dependent upon model of teaching and resources

    • e.

      g. shadowing

  • Significant event analysis could be used as an opportunity to enhance learning around bereavement care, by reflection on “good” and “bad” deaths

  • Courses offered by Further and Higher education institutions, such as Colleges and Universities, Professional Organisations, Hospices and specialist organisations within the voluntary sector such as Cruse Bereavement Care Scotland (CBCS)

  • Inclusion in undergraduate level education for all healthcare and social care professionals

  • Inclusion in Post graduate level education and training

  • Induction courses and local orientation courses

  • Incorporated into updates on communication skills programmes

  • Informal settings such as participation in a Bereavement Forum

12.

HOW should it be delivered?

A tiered approach (Figures 1 and 2) is recommended, based on the National Institute for Health and Clinical Effectiveness (2004) guidance that suggests three components to providing bereavement support:

  • component 1: practical support and advice for all bereaved that would include an explanation of the normality of grief

  • component 2: more formal opportunity to reflect on the loss

  • component 3: specialist support required by those at risk of prolonged grief

Shaping Bereavement Care 36

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