X hits on this document

135 views

0 shares

0 downloads

0 comments

51 / 65

11.

All health boards highlighted a willingness to develop services and

to seek to do this developments could be

in conjunction with others so that fostered through being “part of national

on-going network”,

“Sharing of examples of good practice and training” “.... learn what is happening in other also noted that: It would be difficult to reply to

nationally co-ordinated areas.” However, it was the question around co-

ordination until there may be challenging, it

is is

a definitive model”. feasible, based on the

Whilst a definitive model views from health boards,

a

review

of

bereavement

and

bereavement

care

work

in

Scotland

by

Wimpenny et al (2006), Stephen from England and Wales (DoH

et al (2006) 2005) and

and the strategy documents Northern Ireland (DHSSPS

2009) to identify the scope clear recommendations.

of

the

co-ordination

role

and

to

make

some

The Co-ordinator Role

12.

It is possible to identify some of the breadth of co-ordination that

may be required in bereavement and bereavement care in Scotland. As this figure shows there is a challenging and considerable role for a co- ordinator as, at present, linkage between groups and services does not occur. This is accentuated when linkage across the bereavement journey

is considered from before death, at death and after the death.

13.

The role of the co-ordinator, as illustrated in Figure 5.1, is not

envisaged to be solely one of been bereaved but ensuring

providing direct care to people who have that their bereavement journey can be

travelled with some degree of certainty and that consistent appropriate provision of service is available in all areas or gaps identified and solutions sought to address these.

and are

Shaping Bereavement Care 47

Document info
Document views135
Page views135
Page last viewedSat Dec 03 05:05:30 UTC 2016
Pages65
Paragraphs2141
Words15399

Comments