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No map has been produced for honey buzzard due to the confidential nature of the data.

Woodland management for birds: Priority species

Honey buzzard

and non-intensive agriculture. Woodlands with easy access to old nests of other species, eg carrion crow and buzzard are preferred (old nests of other species are used for breeding).

Nesting: nests are normally located in medium to mature aged trees. Old nests, eg of crows, are often used.

Breeding season:

Mar

Apr

May

June

July

Aug

Sept

Feeding: the main food throughout the breeding season is wasp grubs, although at times, eg early in the season, frogs are a frequent component of the diet. Young pigeons, and young of other bird species are also taken.

Long-distance migrant, wintering in sub-Saharan Africa

Status

  • The Population Status of Birds in Wales: Amber-listed7, 8

  • EU birds directive Annex 1 species

  • Protected under Schedule 1 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981.

Conservation issues

This species, although still rare in Wales, is increasing and there are few serious conservation issues. The main concerns are:

  • disturbance relating to the timing of woodland management operations resulting in nest failure

  • egg-collecting.

Management advice

Population trend and distribution

First confirmed breeding in Wales in 1992, with breeding confirmed most years since then. The current population is considered to be about 10 pairs.

Species requirements

Habitat: traditionally considered a species of mature broadleaved woodland (especially beech), honey buzzards also use conifer plantations. Occupied woodlands are either relatively extensive, or in landscapes with many smaller woodlands

General

  • Keep information relating to breeding honey buzzards confidential to limit recreational disturbance or threat of egg theft.

  • Plan woodland management work to avoid honey buzzard breeding season.

Increase the extent or improve the quality of foraging habitat

  • Create ponds suitable for colonisation by frogs and toads.

  • Create open spaces, such as rides and glades to encourage wasp and bee populations.

7 A scarce breeding species in Wales with a population <30 pairs. 8 Preliminary assessment for 2008 revision of The Population Status of Birds in Wales: Amber-listed.

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