X hits on this document

478 views

0 shares

0 downloads

0 comments

82 / 104

Andy Hay/rspb-images.com

Figure 30 Breeding distribution of the spotted flycatcher in Wales.

Woodland management for birds: Priority species

Spotted flycatcher

is usually partially concealed but with a good field of view. Nestboxes are also used.

Breeding season:

Mar

Apr

May

June

July

Aug

Sept

Long-distance migrant, wintering in sub-Saharan Africa

Status

  • Principal Biodiversity Species in Wales

  • The Population Status of Birds in Wales:

Amber-listed30, 31

Population trend and distribution

Spotted flycatchers are well-distributed throughout Wales although they have declined rapidly in the UK over the last 25 years, the BBS showing a 59% decline between 1994 and 2007. The RWBS showed differing results (+35.1% the RSPB and -58% BTO) since the 1980s (Amar et al. 2006).

Species requirements

Feeding: flying insects, eg ‘house’ and dung flies, butterflies, moths, bees, wasps and beetles. In bad weather, birds will forage in the canopy and occasionally on the ground.

Conservation issues

  • A reduction in nest breeding success due to increased predation (Stoate and Szczur 2006). The amount of nest cover is a key factor in breeding success.

  • There is evidence of declines in other European countries and a reduced survival of first-year birds, possibly at their wintering grounds or on migration (Freeman and Crick 2003), which suggest mechanisms operating outside Europe may be affecting this species (Fuller 2005).

  • A reduction in the biomass of flying insects due to a decline in habitat structure quality.

Management advice

Increase the extent or improve the quality of nest sites

  • Provide nestboxes in suitable habitat where natural sites may be lacking (see nestboxes).

  • Retain ivy and other climbing plants to provide nest sites.

Habitat: mature, deciduous woodland with an open structure and perches for insect- catching sallies. Open parkland, farmland and gardens are also used.

Nesting: nests are located in natural crooks and hollows on the outside of mature tree trunks, buildings or in dense ivy. The nest

Increase the extent or improve the quality of foraging habitat

  • Create open features close to suitable nest sites through felling.

  • Encourage a diversity of structure within the field and shrub layers through control of grazing levels to encourage an increase in insect biomass.

30 Preliminary assessment for 2008 revision of The Population Status of Birds in Wales: Amber-listed. 31 Unfavourable conservation status in Europe, but population not concentrated in Europe.

76

Document info
Document views478
Page views479
Page last viewedSun Dec 11 08:24:18 UTC 2016
Pages104
Paragraphs3113
Words34395

Comments