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Webber, President of the Cardiff Businessmen's Club, was consulted as to the best means of appealing to the people of Wales for sufficient funds to meet every demand. Sir Robert offered a special meeting of the Club to launch the appeal at which the speakers were Sir Henry McMahon and Mr. F. J. Chamberlain, President and Secretary respectively of the National Council of YMCAs. The immediate target was £10,000, and this was achieved in the first year of the war. Before the task was completed, over £110,000 had been raised.

The Association in Wales had every reason to be deeply grateful to Sir Robert Webber for wise counsel and practical support in this early effort which materially assisted the YMCA to order successfully its war time capital expenditure.

With such substantial financial support, solid and well planned Institutes were erected in the following Camps, R.A.F. Stations and Town Centres, between 1940 and 1942:

Outside Central Station, Cardiff Heath Park, Cardiff Brecon Infantry Training Camp Chepstow Racecourse Manorbier A.A. Camp Merrion Anti-Tank Range Carew Cheriton R.A.F. Aberporth A.A. Practice Camp Tonfanau A.A. Practice Camp Ty Croes A.A. Practice Camp Sunnyvale Camp, Rhyl Kinmel Park, Rhyl Fairwood Common R.A.F.

Glanusk Park Newport Docks East Block House Angle R.A.F. Towyn Trawsfynydd Penrhos R.A.F. Llandwrog R.A.F. Valley R.A.F. Hawarden R.A.F. St. Athan R.A.F. Llantwit Major.

The Association rejected no request for its service. Llantwit Major indicated the readiness to meet every appeal. This little town could not provide adequate accommodation for the troops stationed in the district. The only method of building was in permanent materials. A site was secured from the Glamorgan County Council and the Association erected the building at a cost of £3,500. By the end of 1942 altogether over 100 centres had been opened.

Cardiff

Carmarthen

Holyhead

Swansea

Rhyl

Caernarvon

Llanelli

Bango

Pwllheli

HUTS AND HOSTELS ON OR NEAR RAILWAY CENTRES.

In the first month of the war, it was obvious that a day and night canteen service would be required at the principal stations in Wales and, at strategic centres, it would be necessary to provide hostel accommodation. The YMCA, of all the voluntary bodies, practically met the entire need for voluntary welfare work in the large camps and railway centres. Hostels were opened at:

Neath

In addition, huts were erected in co-operation with the War Office, on the railway station platforms at Cardiff, Swansea, Carmarthen, and Holyhead. The total bed accommodation in YMCA hostels was 410. It is estimated that throughout the war, sleeping accommodation was provided for 559,195 men.

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