X hits on this document

PDF document

2014-2015 Educational DVD Catalog - page 39 / 40

88 views

0 shares

0 downloads

0 comments

39 / 40

Features:

  • Closed Captioned

  • Series $149.99

  • 7 programs on 4 DVDs

  • Running time: 399 minutes

CHILD DEVELOPMENT

CHILDHOOD

AS SEEN ON PUBLIC TELEVISION

REVIEWS "These documentaries will effectively spark discussion on parenting and social responsibility." - Booklist

"Comprehensive...all seven titles would interest parents and educators..."

  • -

    Childhood Education

PRODUCT INFORMATION This series has served as the basis of successful Childhood Development courses around the world. Whatever differences may exist among countries, cultures, genera- tions and individuals, the remarkable journey from birth to adolescence is one all people share - often with astounding similarities. From first steps and first words to the transformations of puberty, it is a unique time of discovery and challenge. In seven one-hour programs, CHILDHOOD presents an insightful and richly textured examina- tion of the various influences that shape us as individuals and as members of the fami- lies and societies in which we are raised. Through the observation of twelve families on five continents, the series looks at childhood from a number of perspectives - personal, scientific, historical and cultural- using a variety of production techniques, including documentary sequences, provocative historic films, and vivid clinical illustrations with on-screen commentary by experts.

Program One: Great Expectations One of the major themes of the Childhood series is introduced and explored - the mutual influ- ence and importance of both "nature" and nurture," the ongoing interaction of time, place and biology. Highlights of the premiere program include witnessing three births - in Russia, America and Brazil, to show how different societies approach this universal, yet unique, experience.

Program Two: Louder Than Words An infant may not be able to speak, but research clearly shows that the roots of future personali- ty are present from birth. Observer Jerome Kagan shows why shyness and sociability have a distinct biological component.

Program 3: Love's Labors An exploration of the fascinating period between six months and three years, when almost every day brings startling evidence of rapid maturation in brain and body -improved coordination, in- creased mobility, the acquisition of language and an emerging sense of self.

Program 4: In the Land of the Giants This program features three- to five-year-olds learning the social and psychological intricacies of family life. Observer Urie Bronfenbrenner characterizes the family as "the most efficient means for making human beings human." As the wider world affects the family, the family in turn teach- es children how to view and cope with that wider world as they increasingly interact with it at day care and school.

Program 5: Life's Lessons Between the ages of five and seven, children enter a new and distinctive stage of development called middle childhood, marked by the phenomenon known as "the 5 -7 shift" This change is demonstrated by new abilities and behaviors as children move away from the intimacy of home and family to enter the wider arena of school and work.

Program 6: Among Equals This program explores the importance of peer relationships as a crucial component of develop- ment. Peers provide a context for working out moral dilemmas, social relationships and for de- veloping a strong self identity. At this age children often participate in youth groups and team sports - games that sometimes become rehearsals for life.

Program 7: The House of Tomorrow The Childhood journey concludes with a look at the many emotional and physical transfor- mations that characterize puberty and adolescence. This program shows how that biological metamorphosis - when boys and girls become men and women - is marked in various cultures.

39

Document info
Document views88
Page views88
Page last viewedMon Dec 05 07:21:49 UTC 2016
Pages40
Paragraphs1872
Words17612

Comments