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UNICEF’s education programmes demonstrate the efficacy of sectors working together. Girls’ education, for instance, is not the sole responsibility of educators. Girls remain out of school for myriad reasons. Improved water supplies, separate sanitation facilities, tighter security, school nutrition initiatives, elimination of fees and uniforms, and cash incentives for sending girls to school are all crucial if gender empowerment and ending gender disparity in education are to be realized.

In Indonesia, sector integration was integral to UNICEF’s ‘building back better’ after the 2004 tsunami, and the first 2 of 367 permanent schools opened in Aceh Province in September 2006. By the end of the year, 10 schools were completed. The earthquake-resistant buildings are equipped with spacious, child-friendly

UNICEF ANNUAL REPORT 2006

classrooms, lighting, furnishings, safe running water, separate toilets and outdoor sports fields. These elements coalesce to create schools that draw all children – girls and boys – to the classroom.

In August 2006, the European Union donated 3.7 million euros ($4.7 million) to a UNICEF project to bring safe water and improved sanitation to 500,000 people in Zimbabwe who are HIV infected or affected by AIDS. This single largest donation to a UNICEF water and sanitation initiative in Zimbabwe underscores the importance of safe water and sanitation facilities to defend against AIDS-related illnesses.The project promotes hygiene, the construction of latrines in households and schools, nutrition gardens and the drilling of critical new boreholes.

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