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PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS

Alliances across the public and private sectors generate funds, innovation and ambition. On the international front, three global public-private partnerships have bolstered efforts to improve the lives of children and their families: the GAVI Alliance, the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN) and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS,Tuberculosis and Malaria. National public-private partnerships, such as the Micronutrient Initiative in Canada, have also produced outstanding results for children and mothers in the developing world.

pneumococcus, a major cause of pneumonia, meningitis and sepsis.

The Global Fund to Fight AIDS,Tuberculosis and Malaria raises, manages and disburses money in the battle against three of the world’s deadliest diseases. The Global Fund works with multilateral and bilateral organizations to direct resources to areas with the greatest need.

These three global partnerships are funding sources and do not work directly on the ground. Yet their contributions are felt throughout the developing world.

GAIN helps reduce undernutrition by providing funds for and technical advice on fortified foods and other mechanisms to boost nutrition.The partnership has brought together development agencies, governments, foundations and industries to help feed the hungry.

The GAVI Alliance, formerly known as the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization, provides vaccines to children in the developing world. In 2006, the GAVI Alliance supported two vaccines to weaken the grip of the biggest child killers. One prevents rotavirus, which causes diarrhoeal disease, and the other prevents

Global partnerships allowed thousands of vaccinators in Iraq to go from house to house to conduct polio immunization drives, reaching 4.8 million children. In 2006, more than 220 million children were vaccinated against measles. These alliances also touched the lives of some 26 million Nigerian children who were immunized against measles in a 2006 campaign. And as Uzbekistan’s fortified flour programme works to improve the health of the 33 per cent of children under age five who are anaemic, a public-private partnership fuels the drive.

UNICEF ANNUAL REPORT 2006

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