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HUMAN RESOURCES

UNICEF has embraced the UN reform plan for coordinating human resources management among UN organizations. In partnership with the United Nations Secretariat and Executive Committee agencies (UNICE , United Nations Population Fund, World Food Programme and United Nations Development Programme), the ability to share staff and have them transfer between agencies was bolstered. Staff recruitment campaigns were designed to fulfil medium-term strategic plan objectives and fortify UNICEF’s ability to help countries advance the Millennium Development Goals.

Investment in technology improved staff recruitment at UNICEF. Some 44 per cent of staff hiring in 2006 was completed within 90 days, up from 17 per cent in 2005. For emergency posts, timely appointments rose from 55 per cent to 60 per cent during the same period. (The 60 per cent level of recruitment for emergency posts within 90 days represents fixed-term appointments only.) UNICEF is guided by its Core Commitments for Children in Emergencies, which specify that contingency staff be in place within six to eight weeks after an emergency. But in most instances, placement during emergencies occurs well before that.

UNICEF ANNUAL REPORT 2006

Staff training and education remained paramount. In 2006, a total of 7,114 staff members completed various learning programmes, with more than 6,000 taking advantage of e-learning/self-learning approaches. More than 300 staff members completed a course on working in emergencies.

UNICEF collaborated with think tanks and leading universities, including Maastricht University (the Netherlands), for cutting-edge information in policy analysis. Through a collaboration between UNICEF and the World Bank, 103 government and agency staff members completed the ‘Marginal Budgeting for Bottlenecks’ course, which explored scaling up high-impact health and nutrition interventions.

Partnerships were cultivated with the London School of Economics, Institute for Development Studies and Oxford University, all in the United Kingdom, Economic Policy Research Institute and Institute for Democracy in South Africa, and the World Bank Institute to continue to improve the skills and expertise of the UNICEF staff in the future.

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