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Scenes like this occur in emergency rooms every day. But in this case, the cause - page 2 / 5

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  • Most common and mildest type of OI.

  • Bones predisposed to fracture. Most fractures occur before puberty.

  • Normal or near-normal stature.

  • Loose joins and muscle weakness.

  • Sclera (whites of the eyes) usually have a blue, purple, or gray tint.

  • Triangular face.

  • Tendency toward spinal curvature.

  • Bone deformity absent or minimal.

  • Brittle teeth possible.

  • Hearing loss possible, often beginning in early teens.

  • Collagen structure is normal, but the amount

of collagen is less than normal.

  • Most severe form.

  • Frequently lethal at or shortly after birth, often due to respiratory problems.

  • Numerous fractures and severe bone deformity evident at birth.

  • Small stature with underdeveloped lungs.

  • Collagen is improperly formed.

  • Progressive bone deformity, often severe.

  • Bones fracture easily. Fractures are often present at birth, and x-rays may reveal healed fractures that occurred before birth.

  • Short stature.

  • Sclera have a blue, purple, or gray tint.

  • Loose joints and poor muscle development in arms and legs.

  • Barrel-shaped rib cage.

  • Triangular face.

  • Spinal curvature.

  • Respiratory problems possible.

  • Brittle teeth possible.

  • Hearing loss possible.

  • Collagen is improperly formed.

  • Between Type I and Type III in severity.

  • Bones fracture easily, most before puberty.

  • Shorter than average stature.

  • Sclera are white or near-white

    • (i.

      e. normal in color)

  • Mild to moderate bone deformity.

  • Spinal curvature.

  • Barrel-shaped rib cage.

  • Triangular face.

  • Brittle teeth possible.

  • Hearing loss possible.

  • Collagen is improperly formed.

  • Recently identified types of OI.

  • At this time no collagen defect has been found.

  • Characteristics are similar to Type IV OI.

  • Additional Type V characteristics include:

    • -

      Dense band adjacent to the growth plate

of long bones.

  • -

    Development of hypertrophic

calluses from fracture or surgery.

  • -

    Calcification of the membrane

between the radius and the ulna.

  • Type VI bones have a “fish scale” appearance when viewed under a microscope.

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