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Translated by R.D. Boylan Edited by Nathen Haskell Dole - page 23 / 106





23 / 106


alas! when we have attained our object, when the distant there

cent pleasure as the peasant whose table is covered with food

becomes the present here, all is changed: we are as poor and circumscribed as ever, and our souls still languish for unat-

of his own rearing, and who not only enjoys his meal, but remembers with delight the happy days and sunny mornings

tainable happiness.

when he planted it, the soft evenings when he watered it, and

So does the restless traveller pant for his native soil, and find in his own cottage, in the arms of his wife, in the affec- tions of his children, and in the labour necessary for their support, that happiness which he had sought in vain through the wide world.

When, in the morning at sunrise, I go out to Walheim, and with my own hands gather in the garden the pease which are to serve for my dinner, when I sit down to shell them, and read my Homer during the intervals, and then, selecting a saucepan from the kitchen, fetch my own butter, put my mess

on the fire, cover it up, and sit down to stir it as occasion requires, I figure to myself the illustrious suitors of Penelope, killing, dressing, and preparing their own oxen and swine. Nothing fills me with a more pure and genuine sense of hap- piness than those traits of patriarchal life which, thank Heaven! I can imitate without affectation. Happy is it, indeed, for me that my heart is capable of feeling the same simple and inno-

the pleasure he experienced in watching its daily growth.


THE DAY before yesterday, the physician came from the town to pay a visit to the judge. He found me on the floor playing with Charlotte’s children. Some of them were scrambling over me, and others romped with me; and, as I caught and tickled them, they made a great noise. The doctor is a formal sort of personage: he adjusts the plaits of his ruffles, and continually settles his frill whilst he is talking to you; and he thought my conduct beneath the dignity of a sensible man. I could per- ceive this by his countenance. But I did not suffer myself to be disturbed. I allowed him to continue his wise conversa- tion, whilst I rebuilt the children’s card houses for them as fast as they threw them down. He went about the town after- ward, complaining that the judge’s children were spoiled


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