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The Sorrows ofYoung Werther

JULY 10

YOU SHOULD SEE how foolish I look in company when her name is mentioned, particularly when I am asked plainly how I like her. How I like her! I detest the phrase. What sort of creature must he be who merely liked Charlotte, whose whole heart and senses were not entirely absorbed by her. Like her! Some one asked me lately how I liked Ossian.

JULY 11

MADAME M— is very ill. I pray for her recovery, because Char- lotte shares my sufferings. I see her occasionally at my friend’s house, and to-day she has told me the strangest circumstance. Old M—is a covetous, miserly fellow, who has long worried and annoyed the poor lady sadly; but she has borne her afflic- tions patiently. A few days ago, when the physician informed us that her recovery was hopeless, she sent for her husband (Charlotte was present), and addressed him thus: “I have some- thing to confess, which, after my decease, may occasion trouble and confusion. I have hitherto conducted your household as

frugally and economically as possible, but you must pardon me for having defrauded you for thirty years. At the com- mencement of our married life, you allowed a small sum for the wants of the kitchen, and the other household expenses. When our establishment increased and our property grew larger, I could not persuade you to increase the weekly allow- ance in proportion: in short, you know, that, when our wants were greatest, you required me to supply everything with seven florins a week. I took the money from you without an obser- vation, but made up the weekly deficiency from the money- chest; as nobody would suspect your wife of robbing the household bank. But I have wasted nothing, and should have been content to meet my eternal Judge without this confes- sion, if she, upon whom the management of your establish- ment will devolve after my decease, would be free from em- barrassment upon your insisting that the allowance made to me, your former wife, was sufficient.”

I talked with Charlotte of the inconceivable manner in which men allow themselves to be blinded; how any one could avoid suspecting some deception, when seven florins only were al-

lowed to defray expenses twice as great. But I have myself

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