X hits on this document

PDF document

Translated by R.D. Boylan Edited by Nathen Haskell Dole - page 45 / 106





45 / 106



IF MY ILLS would admit of any cure, they would certainly be cured here. This is my birthday, and early in the morning I received a packet from Albert. Upon opening it, I found one of the pink ribbons which Charlotte wore in her dress the first time I saw her, and which I had several times asked her to give me. With it were two volumes in duodecimo of Wetstein’s “Homer,” a book I had often wished for, to save me the in- convenience of carrying the large Ernestine edition with me upon my walks. You see how they anticipate my wishes, how well they understand all those little attentions of friendship, so superior to the costly presents of the great, which are hu- miliating. I kissed the ribbon a thousand times, and in every breath inhaled the remembrance of those happy and irrevo- cable days which filled me with the keenest joy. Such, Wilhelm, is our fate. I do not murmur at it: the flowers of life are but visionary. How many pass away, and leave no trace behind —how few yield any fruit —and the fruit itself, how rarely does it ripen! And yet there are flowers enough! and is it not strange, my friend, that we should suffer the little that

does really ripen, to rot, decay, and perish unenjoyed? Fare- well! This is a glorious summer. I often climb into the trees in Charlotte’s orchard, and shake down the pears that hang on the highest branches. She stands below, and catches them as they fall.


UNHAPPY BEING that I am! Why do I thus deceive myself? What is to come of all this wild, aimless, endless passion? I cannot pray except to her. My imagination sees nothing but her: all surrounding objects are of no account, except as they relate to her. In this dreamy state I enjoy many happy hours, till at length I feel compelled to tear myself away from her. Ah, Wilhelm, to what does not my heart often compel me! When I have spent several hours in her company, till I feel completely absorbed by her figure, her grace, the divine ex- pression of her thoughts, my mind becomes gradually ex- cited to the highest excess, my sight grows dim, my hearing confused, my breathing oppressed as if by the hand of a mur- derer, and my beating heart seeks to obtain relief for my ach-


Document info
Document views204
Page views204
Page last viewedThu Oct 27 17:42:53 UTC 2016