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Translated by R.D. Boylan Edited by Nathen Haskell Dole - page 68 / 106





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The Sorrows ofYoung Werther

She held the bird to her mouth; and he pressed her sweet lips with so much fervour that he seemed to feel the excess of bliss which he enjoyed.

“He shall kiss you too,” she added; and then she held the bird toward me. His little beak moved from her mouth to mine, and the delightful sensation seemed like the forerunner of the sweetest bliss.

“A kiss,” I observed, “does not seem to satisfy him: he wishes for food, and seems disappointed by these unsatisfactory en- dearments.”

“But he eats out of my mouth,” she continued, and ex- tended her lips to him containing seed; and she smiled with all the charm of a being who has allowed an innocent partici- pation of her love.

I turned my face away. She should not act thus. She ought not to excite my imagination with such displays of heavenly innocence and happiness, nor awaken my heart from its slum- bers, in which it dreams of the worthlessness of life! And why not? Because she knows how much I love her.


IT MAKES ME WRETCHED, Wilhelm, to think that there should be men incapable of appreciating the few things which possess a real value in life. You remember the walnut trees at S—, under which I used to sit with Charlotte, during my visits to the worthy old vicar. Those glorious trees, the very sight of which has so often filled my heart with joy, how they adorned and refreshed the parsonage yard, with their wide-extended branches! and how pleasing was our remembrance of the good old pastor, by whose hands they were planted so many years ago: The schoolmaster has frequently mentioned his name. He had it from his grandfather. He must have been a most excellent man; and, under the shade of those old trees, his memory was ever venerated by me. The schoolmaster in- formed us yesterday, with tears in his eyes, that those trees had been felled. Yes, cut to the ground! I could, in my wrath, have slain the monster who struck the first stroke. And I must endure this! —I, who, if I had had two such trees in my own court, and one had died from old age, should have wept with real affliction. But there is some comfort left, such a thing is


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