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CORPORATE TECHNOLOGY

Three Nobel Prize laureates in physics have worked at Siemens. From top: Gustav Hertz, Dennis Gabor and Ernst Ruska. And other Siemens researchers have also earned worldwide renown, includ- ing Walter Schottky and Heinrich Welker. Today, top results are usually achieved by teams, rather than individual researchers.

100 Years of Corporate Research at Siemens

Interview with Claus Weyrich

90

Light

92

Semiconductors and Microsystems

94

Computers and Software

96

Communications Technology

98

Microscopy and Imaging Techniques

100

Piezo Technology

102

Power Engineering

104

100

YEARS

OF

CO R P O R AT E

RESEARCH

AT

SIEMENS

I n 1905, researcher Werner Bolton became head of the first corporate research laboratory at Siemens — the forerunner of today’s Corporate Technology (CT). To com- memorate this anniversary, Pictures of the Future is pre- senting a 16-page retrospective that lists the most impor- tant research and development milestones at Siemens — milestones that made a key contribution to the company’s international renown (see chart, right). Many other impor- tant events in the company’s lively history (chart below) must remain unmentioned due to lack of space. And al- though various Group labs also developed solutions just as basic as those created by Corporate Research, only a few of these are mentioned here. This special section of Pictures of the Future is meant to create a link between the history of the company, its current research projects, and future trends. Claus Weyrich, who has led Corporate Technology since 1996, explains the transformation of industrial research over the past decades (p. 90). The current con- figuration of Siemens Corporate Technology, which was established by Heinz Beckurts and Hans Günter Daniel- meyer between the 1980s and the mid ‘90s, is the result of a restructuring project that was commissioned by none other than Klaus Kleinfeld, who is now CEO of Siemens AG.

1975: Thyristors for energy transmission

THE TOP TEN IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

120

Total sales (2004, in billions of euros) Sales in electrical engineering and electronics

R&D expenditure (in billions of euros)

6

100

5

80

4

60

3

40

2

20

1

  • 0

    GE

IBM

Siemens Hitachi Hewlett- Matsu- Packard shita

Sony Samsung Toshiba

Dell

0

1984: Hicom telephone system

2000: Piezo injection for diesel engines

2000: syngo user interface

2004: 64-slice computer tomograph

1 ,000 ,000

500 ,000

Logarithmic scale

Number of employees Sales: 1847–1914 in millions of marks, 1924–1944 in millions of reichsmarks, 1949–2004 in millions of euros (converted from deutsch marks for the period before 2000)

1974: Computer tomograph

1965: Integrated circuit

1980: EWSD (digital switching technology)

2003: Transrapid in Shanghai

100,000

50,000

1881: Electric streetcar

1924: Traffic light

1939: Electron microscope

10 ,000

5,000

1,000

1881: Telephone switchboard

1953: High-purity silicon

1959: Fully transistorized universal computer 1958: Heart pacemaker

1985: ICE train with top speed of 300 km/h

1998: Switch for data transfer of one terabit per second

500

1847: Telegraph

2004: Biolab on a chip

100

50

1879: Electric train

1906: Vacuum cleaner

1935: Coaxial cable

1959: Simatic (electronic automation)

1998: World record for power plant efficiency

1866: Dynamo

1931: Electric hair dryer

1994: High- temperature fuel cells

10

5

1847: Werner von Siemens founds the company

1905: Tantalum lamp

1905: First corporate laboratory

1988: Megabit chip

2004: Full-body MR tomo-

graphy

0 1847

‘501860187018801 019110192019301940195 4196 ‘09001980 19 20

Pictures of the Future | Fall 2005

89

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