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Language Arts Curriculum Guide - page 39 / 70

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  • Narrative – A story that is centered on some question, tension, or conflict. The purpose of a narrative is to share a personal perspective on the world and tell a story. Narratives include personal experience stories, recounts, imaginative stories, etc. Narratives:

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      Have a clearly defined point of view

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        Have strong beginnings

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        Build to a high point

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        Wind down to a resolution of conflict or problem

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        Answers a central question

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        Include a plot, setting, and sense of time

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        Have a least one main character

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        Can be told in the first or third person

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        Are often based on a real event

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        Can take liberties with the truth

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        May include elements of fantasy

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        Have a storyline that can be retold

  • Response to Literature – Responding in writing to stories or books that students have read focusing the reader on what they see, feel, or think about the text.

  • Descriptive – Descriptive writing describes in detail a person, place, time, mood or object. It paints a vivid picture by using the senses. Descriptive writing enriches and defines a central impression and goes beyond the obvious or general. The details are bright, significant, and telling. It enables the reader to relive what the author is telling.

  • Persuasive – Persuasive writing is written in an organizational pattern that is similar to expository writing. In elementary schools, this type of writing usually includes a five paragraph essay which has an introductory paragraph, three interior paragraphs that support the writer’s opinion and are supported by details, and a concluding paragraph. To persuade, writers must:

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        Make a claim

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        Offer reasons for that claim

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        Provide examples or details that illustrate the reasoning, and

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        Address counter arguments

  • Summary – A brief retelling of a text stating the main idea of the material supported by important details. A summary is written in the writer’s own words – not the words of the author of the original text.

Guided Writing: As in guided reading, the teacher’s role in guided writing is to guide students, respond to them, and expand their thinking in the process of composing text. The teacher is the facilitator helping students discover what they want to convey and how to write it meaningfully. The focus is on a skill or strategy that has already been modeled. The student holds the pen and does the writing.

Independent Writing: Independent writing is writing students do without help from the teacher. While the genre might be assigned rather than self-selected – for example, students might be asked to write a personal narrative or a book critique – the role of the teacher is to observe, to offer help if asked and reinforce their accomplishments. Independent writing is a culmination of all learned strategies applied to real world writing.

Interactive Writing: Child and teacher share the pen. The teacher reads a story aloud to the class several times and then they discuss together the text to be written on large chart paper. Individual children write the letters/words they hear/know on the chart with a colorful marker. The teacher uses a different color marker and provides the letter/words the children don’t know, so the writing becomes a cooperative effort between the children and teacher. When the story rewrite is finished, the chart is put on the classroom wall and used as a text for students to read.

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