X hits on this document

351 views

0 shares

0 downloads

0 comments

49 / 86

Managing labour migration: The case of the Filipino and Indonesian domestic helper market in Hong Kong 39

The initial findings suggest a correlation between the level of migration infrastructure found in the sending and receiving states and the frequency of contract violations among migrant workers. However, varying characteristics among the two populations studied in this report, such as age and level of education, could also explain the differences observed in the migrants’ welfare. By continuing to collect additional data, the impact of migration infrastructures on the welfare of migrants, as measured by the frequency of contract violations, can be isolated.

¾

Measure migrant workers’ satisfaction of services provided by states. While measuring the frequency of contract violations shed insight on the impact of

migration infrastructures, it is insufficient to understand preventing, or even addressing contract violations, negatively and inadvertently affect the welfare of

their efficacy. While state services could

migrants.

Personal

experiences

or

stories

from

others

have

led

to

some

migrants’

preference

of

services

from

non-governmental

organizations

or

the

host

state,

over

their

home

countries’

services.

The

survey

we

conducted

attempted

to

capture

the

migrant

workers’ perception of the services they received from their home country while in Hong Kong. Unfortunately, the limited survey data

and host could not

be adequately analyzed to support resources, the efficacy of migration better measured.

any initial findings. infrastructure and state

With additional services can be

¾ Use separate methods to collect data for the variables. This report used a household survey to measure all of the above variables, leading to various challenges in data analysis. For example, the survey asked migrants to list the amount they paid on numerous pre-departure expenses such as passports, training or medical fees. The varying arrival dates among the migrants, variable exchange rates, and uncertainty among the migrants, made their quantitative

responses incomparable.

In addition, significant analysis could not be

conducted with the data collected on migrants’ perception of state services. First, there was no data to serve as a benchmark for the average migrants’ expectations of their home country’s services. Based on culture and history, Indonesian migrants’ standard expectation of their country’s services may be markedly different from a Filipino migrants’ standard expectation of services from the Philippine government. Second, selectivity bias could impact the analysis of the data, with victims of contract violations having very different expectations than migrants who never sought services from their home or host countries.

For a list of potential variables in further hypothesis testing, please see Appendix VI.

Document info
Document views351
Page views351
Page last viewedFri Dec 09 08:16:05 UTC 2016
Pages86
Paragraphs2207
Words20246

Comments