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CUSTOM CULTURES

Culture Name

Culture EnglishName

Approx. Number Of Users Of This Language In This Region

bn-BD

Bengali (Bangladesh)

125,000,000

eo

Esperanto

2,000,000

fj-FJ

Fijian (Fiji)

364,000

gd-GB

Gaelic (United Kingdom)

88,892

tlh-KX

Klingonese (Klingon) (“tlh” is the ISO code assigned to “tlhIngan Hol”, the name for the Klingon language)

431,892,000,000

la

Latin

?

tl-PH

Tagalog (Philippines)

14,000,000

States) custom culture in this chapter is just such a culture. This scenario applies equally to the various expatriate communities around the world. For example, there is a sizable population of British expatriates in France and Spain, generating a demand for English (France) and English (Spain) custom cultures.

A variation of this theme is to create a custom culture for which either the coun- try and/or the language is not currently supported by the .NET Framework (or Win- dows). Table 11.2 shows some examples.

Table 11.2

Examples of Custom Cultures for Unsupported Countries or Languages

Another equally important use for custom cultures is to support pseudo transla- tions. In the section “Choosing a Culture for Pseudo Translation,” in Chapter 9, “Machine Translation,” I introduced a PseudoTranslator class that performs a pseudo translation from a Latin-based language to an accented version of the same language. The benefit is that the localization process can be tested, and developers and testers can still use the localized application without having to learn another lan- guage. In the implementation in Chapter 9, an existing culture was hijacked to serve

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